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The European Yearbook of Minority Issues provides a critical and timely review of contemporary developments in minority-majority relations in Europe. It combines analysis, commentary and documentation in relation to conflict management, international legal developments and domestic legislation affecting minorities in Europe.
Part I contains scholarly articles and, in the 2019 volume, it centres on religious issues that have come before courts of law.
Part II contains reports on national and international developments.
Part III features book reviews introducing and critiquing new, relevant literature within the disciplines of the social sciences, humanities and law.

Apart from providing a unique annual overview of minority issues for both scholars and practitioners in this field, the Yearbook is an indispensable reference tool for libraries, research institutes as well as governments and international organisations.

The European Yearbook of Minority Issues is also available online.
Implementing the principle of equality is particularly challenging in federal or decentralised states. Autonomy rights guaranteed to regions or to minorities allow for diversity but question the equality of citizens. While diversity is crucial for legitimate governance in heterogeneous states, it jeopardises equal rights and opportunities. In states based on power-sharing the conceptualisation and implementation of equality therefore raises fundamental questions. How much equality between regional regimes or the rights and freedoms of individuals does the unity of a state require? And how much inequality must be tolerated? This book examines different approaches by which states characterised by federal or decentralised arrangements reconcile equality and autonomy. In case studies from five continents, leading experts analyse the challenges of ensuring institutional, social and economic equality whilst respecting the competences of regions and the rights of groups.
This book casts new light on the application of the principle of proportionality in international law. Proportionality is claimed to play a central role governing the exercise of public power in international law and has been presented as the ‘ultimate rule of law’. It has also been the subject of fierce criticism: it is argued that it leads to unreflexive and arbitrary application of the law and deprives rights of their role as a ’firewall’ protecting individuals. But the debate on proportionality has tended to focus on the question of ‘how’ proportionality should be carried out. Much less attention has been devoted to the question of ‘who’.
This edited volume bring together scholars from a wide range of areas of international law to consider that question: whose interests are at stake when courts and other legal authorities apply the principle of proportionality? In so doing, this volume casts new light on the role which proportionality can play in international law, in shaping and modulating the power relations between the different entities governed by it.
Practical and Theoretical Challenges to 21st Century Federalism
Beyond Autonomy forces us to rethink the meaning of autonomy as a central organising pillar of federalism. Can federations exist beyond the autonomy realm designed to promote territorial self-governance and direct representation among various levels of government? How do governments of federal systems interact over the design and implementation of policy in highly topical areas such as security, where the optimal distribution of authority is blurred? Which mechanisms promote the compromise necessary in many of today’s democratic federal systems? How do newly emerging federations in Africa and Asia design federal institutions in order to decrease conflict while promoting national solidarity? How can federal systems protect the rights of non-territorial minorities such as many indigenous peoples?
Author: Huw Llewellyn
Huw Llewellyn offers a comparative institutional analysis of the five United Nations criminal tribunals (for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Cambodia and Lebanon), assessing the strengths and weaknesses of their institutional forms in supporting the governance, independence and impartiality of these pioneering criminal justice bodies.

Largely overlooked in the otherwise comprehensive literature on international criminal justice, this book focuses on “parenthood”, “oversight” and “ownership” by the tribunals’ governing bodies, concepts unnecessary in national jurisdictions, and traces the tension between governance and judicial independence through the different phases of the tribunals’ lifecycles: from their establishment to commencement of operations, completion of mandates and closure, and finally to the “afterlife” of their residual phase.
This book offers a legal analysis of sharing of passenger data from the EU to the US in light of the EU legal framework protecting individuals’ privacy and personal data. It aims to situate this analysis with respect to the ever-growing policies of Global North countries to introduce pre-screening procedures in border control proceedings for the purpose of the fight against terrorism. By tracing the literature on the (in)securitisation and as such depoliticization of border controls through technology-led interventions, it explores the multiplicity of purposes that passenger data sharing entail and considers the question on the limitability of fundamental rights depending on its purpose.
Domestic Practice vis-à-vis International Standards
Tadesse Simie Metekia’s Prosecution of Core Crimes in Ethiopia offers an in-depth analysis of core crimes trials in Ethiopia within the broader frame of international criminal law. This book is a result of an unprecedented data collection, a meticulous exploration of relevant national and international norms and case laws, as well as a full engagement with the existing literature on the domestic application of international criminal law.
A comparative examination of the actual trials and the manner in which Ethiopia set prosecutions of core crimes in motion, Metekia’s book is a significant achievement in terms of furthering academic knowledge and of contributing to the wider policy debates on international criminal justice and on the role of states in prosecuting atrocities.
The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives. The Thematic Section of Volume 2, entitled ‘Disasters and…: Exploring New Areas of Research’, was conceived to critically assess the relationship between disasters and a variety of different branches, topics or theoretical approaches pertaining to international law, as a means of focusing attention toward less explored and emerging fields of study and practice.
Essays in Honour of Professor José Iturmendi Morales
Challenges to Legal Theory offers the reader a fascinating journey through a variety of multi-disciplinary topics, ranging from law and literature, and law and religion, to legal philosophy and constitutional law. The collection reflects some of the challenges that the field of legal theory currently faces. It is compiled by a selection of international and Spanish scholars, whose essays are made available in English translation for the first time. The volume is based on a collection of essays, published in Spanish, in honour of Professor José Iturmendi Morales, of Complutense University, Madrid, and brings the rich scholarship of pre-eminent Spanish scholars of law and legal theory to an international audience.