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Author: Georg Ziaja
Das Lexikon bietet 80 Biographien der bedeutendsten katholischen Bischöfe Polens im 16. Jahrhundert. Berücksichtigt wurden folgende elf Diözesen: Gnesen, Lemberg, Krakau, Posen, Włocławek, Płock, Kulm, Ermland, Chełm, Przemyśl und Kamieniec. Jeder der Beiträge bietet dem Leser nicht nur biographische Daten, sondern auch eine Fülle von Fachinformationen bezüglich des »Goldenen Zeitalters« in Polen, eine reichhaltige Statistik der Zeitperiode 1500–1600 in Form von übersichtlichen Tabellen, zwei Karten Polens bzw. der Rzeczpospolita mit Aufteilung der Diözesen (um 1000 und 1569) sowie eine sehr detaillierte Literaturliste zu jedem Biogramm – insgesamt ein umfangreiches Nachschlagewerk zur Geschichte und Kultur Polens im 16. Jahrhundert und eine Pionierarbeit auf diesem Gebiet in deutscher Sprache.
In: Lexikon der katholischen Bischöfe im Polen des Goldenen Zeitalters 1500-1600
In: Lexikon der katholischen Bischöfe im Polen des Goldenen Zeitalters 1500-1600
In: Lexikon der katholischen Bischöfe im Polen des Goldenen Zeitalters 1500-1600
In: Lexikon der katholischen Bischöfe im Polen des Goldenen Zeitalters 1500-1600
Brill in cooperation with the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, for the first time brings together a unique collection of rare primary sources on a vital and dynamic part of the history of Turkey, Russia, the Middle East and Western Europe Russian-Ottoman Relations. During the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, the balance of power between Russia and the Ottoman Empire was constantly monitored in Western Europe, where several powers had designs of their own on some of the Ottoman territories. In Germany and France, in particular, all kinds of accounts, opinions, and plans were published that were influenced by, or aimed to influence, Russian-Ottoman relations. They include publications of relevant government documents, diplomatic reports, travel accounts that provided new details about hitherto relatively unknown regions, and fiercely political (and polemical) tracts and pamphlets designed to rally public support for one power or the other. Published across Europe over a period of two centuries, these sources provide detailed insights not only in the military ebb and flow of Russian-Ottoman relations, but also in their effects on European public opinion.

This series currently consists of 4 parts:
Part 1: The Origins, 1600-1800
Part 2: Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853
Part 3: The Crimean War, 1854-1856
Part 4: The End of the Empires, 1857-1914

Part 1: The Origins, 1600-1800
Relations between the Ottoman Empire and Russia were no less conflictual in the eighteenth century: They were at war in 1736-39, 1768-74, and 1787. In the infamous Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca of 1774, the Ottomans were forced to acknowledge the independence of the Crimea (under Russian influence) and of the northern coasts of the Black Sea. It was not until the Treaty of Jassy in 1792 that peaceful relations between the Ottomans and the Russians were restored.

Location of originals: National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg
• Number of titles: 263
• Languages used: Western languages, German, French, English
• Title list available
• MARC records available

In this collection Russian views are represented by such publications as no. 685 by Anatole Demidov (1812- 1870), traveler and patron of the arts; the discussion on the peace by former diplomat Tchihatchef; and the accounts of the Russian veteran, Piotr Andreevich Viazemsky (1792-1878). The opinions of two Turkish officers, Rustem Effendi and Seid Bey, and the views on the Crimean War of the Algerian poet, Muhammad b. Ismail (1820- 1870) are also included. On the British side the influential works of the virulently anti- Russian diplomat, David Urquhart (1805-1877), are well-represented, as well as more moderate publications.

Location of originals: National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg more moderate publications.
Author: Torke
Author: Kahle