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Edited by Judith Keene and Elizabeth Rechniewski

The challenge for historians, as for individuals and nations, has been to make sense of the Cold War past without recourse to the obsolete frameworks of a dichotomous world. The editors of Seeking Meaning, Seeking Justice in the Post-Cold War World, Judith Keene and Elizabeth Rechniewski, have brought together contributions that address the diverse modes by which the Cold War is being assessed, with a major focus on countries on the periphery of the Cold War confrontation. These approaches include developments in historiography as new intellectual and cultural frame are applied to old debates. Authors also consider the ‘universal’ principles and moral discourses, including that of human rights, on which judgements have been based and judicial processes instigated; and the forms of memorialisation that have sought to come to terms, and perhaps achieve reconciliation, with a Cold War past.

Contributors are: Ann Curthoys, Philip Deery, Katherine Hite, Michael Humphrey, Su-kyong Hwang, Perry Johansson, Judith Keene, Betty O'Neill, Peter Read, Elizabeth Rechniewski, Estela Valverde, Adrian Vickers and Marivic Wyndham

Women's ILO

Transnational Networks, Global Labour Standards, and Gender Equity, 1919 to Present

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Edited by Eileen Boris, Dorothea Hoehtker and Susan Zimmerman

What is the place of women in global labour policies? Women’s ILO: Transnational Networks, Global Labour Standards, and Gender Equity, 1919 to Present gathers new research on a century of ILO engagement with women’s work. It asks: what was the role of women’s networks in shaping ILO policies and what were the gendered meanings of international labour law in a world of uneven and unequal development? Women’s ILO explores issues like equal remuneration, home-based labour, and social welfare internationally and in places such as Argentina, Italy, and Ghana. It scrutinizes the impact of both power relations and global feminisms on the making of global labour policies in a world shaped by colonialism, the Cold War and post-colonial inequality. It further charts the disparate advancement of gender equity, highlighting the significant role of women experts and activists in the process.

Contributors are: Paula Lucía Aguilar, Lucia Artner, Eloisa Betti, Chris Bonner, Eileen Boris, Akua O. Britwum, Dorothy Sue Cobble, Dorothea Hoehtker, Pat Horn, Sonya Michel, Silke Neunsinger, Renana Jhabvala, Marieke Louis, Yevette Richards, Mahua Sarkar, Kirsten Scheiwe, Françoise Thébaud, Susan Zimmermann

“This is a must-read volume for scholars and students interested in women, labor and international/transnational history.” – Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, University of California, Irvine, USA
“This fascinating collection of essays assesses the ILO’s role in securing social justice for women workers around the world and asks how that role might change as the world of work is transformed in the next century.” — Celia Donert, University of Liverpool
“This exciting collection provides a long-overdue state of the art on gender politics and the ILO. It will no doubt be the work of reference on the topic for years to come.” – Elisabeth Prügl, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva

The EU as a Global Actor - Bridging Legal Theory and Practice

Liber Amicorum in honour of Ricardo Gosalbo Bono

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Edited by Jenő Czuczai and Frederik Naert

Santa Bárbara’s Legacy

An Environmental History of Huancavelica, Peru

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Nicholas A. Robins

In Santa Bárbara’s Legacy: An Environmental History of Huancavelica, Peru, Nicholas A. Robins presents the first comprehensive environmental history of a mercury producing region in Latin America. Tracing the origins, rise and decline of the regional population and economy from pre-history to the present, Robins explores how people’s multifaceted, intimate and often toxic relationship with their environment has resulted in Huancavelica being among the most mercury-contaminated urban areas on earth. The narrative highlights issues of environmental justice and the toxic burdens that contemporary residents confront, especially many of those who live in adobe homes and are exposed to mercury, as well as lead and arsenic, on a daily basis. The work incorporates archival and printed primary sources as well as scientific research led by the author.

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Edited by Sandra Robinson and Alastair Niven

In Discourses of Empire and Commonwealth a range of prominent writers and critics reflect on the legacy of imperialism and the role of writers in forging a new, more cosmopolitan identity. The contributors, writing about a wide range of countries, affirm the freedom of the human spirit, even within unjust or oppressive social systems. They show the power of words to illuminate injustices and unite different peoples.

Salman Rushdie famously declared that Commonwealth Literature has had its day: this book provides a vital antidote to this idea. Editors Sandra Robinson and Alastair Niven have put together this mixture of personal reflections, critical overviews, historical re-evaluations and creative works to illustrate the vitality of this genre.


South Africa after Apartheid

Policies and Challenges of the Democratic Transition

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Edited by Arrigo Pallotti and Ulf Engel

As South Africa has entered the third decade after the end of apartheid, this book aims at taking stock of the post-apartheid dynamics in the, so far, often less-comprehensively analysed, but crucial fields of APRM-relevant politics, social development, land and regional relations. In the first part of the book an analysis of some structuring domestic features of post-apartheid South Africa is provided, with a focus on political processes and debates around gender, HIV/AIDS and religion. The second part of the volume focuses on the land question and part three is looking at South Africa’s role in the Southern African region.

Contributors are: Nancy Andrew, Nicholas Dietrich, Ulf Engel, Harvey M. Feinberg, Anna-Maria Gentili, Preben Kaarsholm, Mandisa Mbali, David Moore, Arrigo Pallotti, Roberta Pellizzoli, Chris Saunders, Timothy Scarnecchia, Cherryl Walker, Lorenzo Zambernardi, and Mario Zamponi.

Human Rights, Hegemony, and Utopia in Latin America

Poverty, Forced Migration and Resistance in Mexico and Colombia

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Camilo Pérez Bustillo and Karla Hernández Mares

Human Rights, Hegemony and Utopia in Latin America: Poverty, Forced Migration and Resistance in Mexico and Colombia by Camilo Pérez-Bustillo and Karla Hernández Mares explores the evolving relationship between hegemonic and counter-hegemonic visions of human rights, within the context of cases in contemporary Mexico and Colombia, and their broader implications. The first three chapters provide an introduction to the book´s overall theoretical framework, which will then be applied to a series of more specific issues (migrant rights and the rights of indigenous peoples) and cases (primarily focused on contexts in Mexico and Colombia,), which are intended to be illustrative of broader trends in Latin America and globally.

J. Bruce Jacobs

The Kaohsiung Incident of 1979-1980 disturbed Taiwan’s dictatorship and ultimately contributed to Taiwan’s democratization. This book analyzes the precursors to the Kaohsiung Incident, the Kaohsiung Incident itself, the following trials and the contributions of these events to Taiwan’s democratization.
After the indictments were issued, the murder of the mother and twin daughters of Lin I-hsiung, one of the defendants, shocked Taiwan and the world. The government accused the author, a well-known scholar of Taiwan, of being involved in the murder case and he was placed under “police protection” for three months. Part 2 of this book is the writer’s memoir of that period.