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Volume Editor: Alessia Frassani
This volume explores how visual arts functioned in the indigenous pre- and post-conquest New World as vehicles of social, religious, and political identity. Twelve scholars in the field of visual arts examine indigenous artistic expressions in the American continent from the pre-Hispanic age to the present. The contributions offer new interpretations of materials, objects, and techniques based on a critical analysis of historical and iconographic sources and argue that indigenous agency in the continent has been primarily conceived and expressed in visual forms in spite of the textual epistemology imposed since the conquest.

Contributors are: Miguel Arisa, Mary Brown, Ananda Cohen-Aponte, Elena FitzPatrick Sifford, Alessia Frassani, Jeremy James George, Orlando Hernández Ying, Angela Herren Rajagopalan, Keith Jordan, Lorena Tezanos Toral, Marcus B. Burke, and Lawrence Waldron.
Volume Editors: Megan Henvey, Amanda Doviak, and Jane Hawkes
Bringing together the work of scholars from disparate fields of enquiry, this volume provides a timely and stimulating exploration of the themes of transmission and translation, charting developments, adaptations and exchanges – textual, visual, material and conceptual – that reverberated across the medieval world, within wide-ranging temporal and geographical contexts. Such transactions generated a multiplicity of fusions expressed in diverse and often startling ways – architecturally, textually and through peoples’ lived experiences – that informed attitudes of selfhood and ‘otherness’, senses of belonging and ownership, and concepts of regionality, that have been further embraced in modern and contemporary arenas of political and cultural discourse.
Contributors are Tarren Andrews, Edel Bhreathnach, Cher Casey, Katherine Cross, Amanda Doviak, Elisa Foster, Matthias Friedrich, Jane Hawkes, Megan Henvey, Aideen Ireland, Alison Killilea, Ross McIntire, Lesley Milner, John Mitchell, Nino Simonishvili, and Rachael Vause.
The open access publication of this book has been published with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation.

In Shrines in a Fluid Space: The Shaping of New Holy Sites in the Ionian Islands, the Peloponnese and Crete under Venetian Rule (14th-16th Centuries), Argyri Dermitzaki reconstructs the devotional experiences within the Greek realm of the Venetian Stato da Mar of Western European pilgrims sailing to Jerusalem. The author traces the evolution of the various forms of cultic sites and the perception of them as nodes of a wider network of the pilgrims’ ‘holy topography’. She scrutinises travelogues in conjunction with archaeological, visual and historical evidence and offers a study of the cultic phenomena and sites invested with exceptional meaning at the main ports of call of the pilgrims’ galleys in the Ionian Sea, the Peloponnese and Crete.
In The Pechenegs: Nomads in the Political and Cultural Landscape of Medieval Europe, Aleksander Paroń offers a reflection on the history of the Pechenegs, a nomadic people which came to control the Black Sea steppe by the end of the ninth century. Nomadic peoples have often been presented in European historiography as aggressors and destroyers whose appearance led to only chaotic decline and economic stagnation. Making use of historical and archaeological sources along with abundant comparative material, Aleksander Paroń offers here a multifaceted and cogent image of the nomads’ relations with neighboring political and cultural communities in the tenth and eleventh centuries.
Volume Editors: Susana Zapke and Elisabeth Gruber
This volume offers a comprehensive introduction to the major political, social, economic, and cultural developments in Vienna from c. 1100 to c. 1500. It provides a multidisciplinary view of the complexity of the vibrant city on the Danube. The volume is divided into four sections: Vienna, the city and urban design, politics, economy and sovereignty, social groups and communities, and spaces of knowledge, arts, and performance. An international team of eighteen scholars examines issues ranging from the city’s urban environment and art history, to economic and social concerns, using a range of sources and reflecting the wide array of possible approaches to the study of medieval Vienna today.

Contributors are: Peter Csendes, Ulrike Denk, Thomas Ertl, Christian Gastgeber, Thomas Haffner, Martha Keil, Franz Kirchweger, Heike Krause, Christina Lutter, Paul Mitchell, Kurt Mühlberger, Zoë Opačić, Ferdinand Opll, Barbara Schedl, Christoph Sonnlechner, and Peter Wright.
Volume Editor: Salvatore Cosentino
This book offers a collection of essays on Byzantine Italy, the area from which we have inherited the richest and best-preserved historical evidence among all of the regions of the former Eastern Roman Empire up to the 11th century. The collection aims to provide readers with a critical overview of current research as well as new insights concerning political, institutional, economic, social, cultural and environmental aspects of the Italian regions under Byzantine rule. The methodological approach of the volume combines history with archaeology and art history, while remaining focused on the general framework of the early medieval Mediterranean. The result is a fresh and up-to-date synthesis that can be useful both for specialists and students.

Contributors are: Lucia Arcifa, Paul Arthur, Isabella Baldini, Massimo Bernabò, Brunella Bruno, Salvatore Cosentino, Nathaniel Cutajar, Francesco D’Aiuto, Paola Degni, Deborah Deliyannis, Vera von Falkenhausen, Sauro Gelichi, Federico Marazzi, Jean-Marie Martin, Alessandra Molinari, Enrico Morini, Annliese Nef, Ghislaine Noye, Annick Peters-Custot, Vivien Prigent, Mario Re, Denis Sami, Pier Giorgio Spanu, and Enrico Zanini.

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Author: Inna Islanova
This is a book about the archaeological sites of the 5th to 8th century of the Volga-Baltic watershed in the forest zone of Eastern Europe. The region has long been known for burial assemblages of the so-called culture of the Pskov long barrows, but the book brings to light a different group of sites. The population living on those sites co-existed with those who buried their dead under the Pskov long barrows, but within a different landscape. This polarity suggests that the local population was behind the culture of Pskov long barrows, while the new category of site point to immigrants from the southwest. The book suggests that the "new" archaeological sites were inhabited by a Slavic-speaking population from the periphery of the Kiev and Kolochin cultures.
Editor: Vanessa Davies
The Phoebe A. Hearst Expedition to Naga ed-Deir, Cemeteries N 2000 and N 2500 presents the results of excavations directed by George A. Reisner and led by Arthur C. Mace. The site of Naga ed-Deir, Egypt, is unusual for its continued use over a long period of time (c. 3500 BCE–650 CE). Burials in N 2000 and N 2500 date to the First Intermediate Period/Middle Kingdom and the Coptic era. In keeping with Reisner’s earlier publications of Naga ed-Deir, this volume presents artifacts in chapter-length studies devoted to a particular object type and includes a burial-by-burial description. The excavators’ original drawings, notes, and photographs are complemented by a contemporary analysis of the objects by experts in their subfields.
New Approaches to Ancient Material Culture in the Greek & Roman World is about Classical Archaeology at its broadest and is important reading to all Classicists. As part of a recent movement to highlight the rich diversity of the subject it overcomes traditional disciplinary boundaries to show the variety of current approaches to the study of Classical Antiquity from the Late Bronze Age to the Late Antique period. The multi-disciplinary papers deal with archaeology and art history, museum objects and fieldwork data, ancient texts and material culture, archaeological theory and historiography, and technical and literary analysis. The international contributors discuss a selection of methodologies currently used to study ancient material, and illustrate their relevance through case studies which span the Greek and Roman world.