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In the Arab world, people belong to kinship groups (lineages and tribes). Many lineages are named after animals, birds, and plants. Why? This survey evaluates five old explanations – “totemism,” “emulation of predatory animals,” “ancestor eponymy,” “nicknaming,” and “Bedouin proximity to nature.” It suggests a new hypothesis: Bedouin tribes use animal names to obscure their internal cleavages. Such tribes wax and wane as they attract and lose allies and clients; they include “attached” elements as well as actual kin. To prevent outsiders from spotting “attached” groups, Bedouin tribes scatter non-human names across their segments, making it difficult to link any segment with a human ancestor. Young’s argument contributes to theories of tribal organization, Arab identity, onomastics, and Near Eastern kinship.
The Handbook of Formosan Languages provides a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the aboriginal languages of Taiwan and of the many ways in which they have been studied. It contains reference articles as well as grammar sketches of a number of Formosan languages, including a few extinct languages, written by leading scholars inthe field.
The handbook includes up-to-date bibliographical references and indices and is illustrated with tables, maps, and other useful figures. An invaluable reference to Formosanists, Austronesianists, and typologists, it will be of interest to linguists more broadly as well.
Brill’s Handbooks in Linguistics series publishes comprehensive reference works on the language sciences. While works on all relevant fields are welcome, particular attention is paid to new and emerging fields, fields which do not yet have comprehensive reference works, and fields which do have such reference works but these are outdated. The series is currently being revamped, with several handbooks in the pipeline. Topics of upcoming volumes include Formosan Languages, Contrastive Pragmatics, and Cognitive Semantics.
Brill’s Handbooks in Linguistics series publishes comprehensive reference works on the language sciences. While works on all relevant fields are welcome, particular attention is paid to new and emerging fields, fields which do not yet have comprehensive reference works, and fields which do have such reference works but these are outdated. The series is currently being revamped, with several handbooks in the pipeline. Topics of upcoming volumes include Formosan Languages, Contrastive Pragmatics, and Cognitive Semantics.
This is the first book-length study of the roles played by the Manchu language at the center of the Qing empire at the height of its power in the eighteenth century.
It presents a revisionist account of Manchu not as a language in decline, but as extensively and consciously used language in a variety of areas.
It treats the use, discussion, regulation, and philological study of Manchu at the court of an emperor who cared deeply for the maintenance and history of the language of his dynasty.
Volume Editor:
This edited volume provides a comparative exploration of corresponding concepts of the abyss in various languages and cultures. Fourteen chapters investigate ancient cultures such as Hebrew, Ancient Greek, Sanskrit and Old Norse, but also more contemporary American, African and Asian languages, such as Hawaiian, Umbundu, Chinese and Khasi, as well as European languages, such as German, Estonian, English, French, Polish and Russian. The book combines ethnolinguistics with history of ideas, literature, folklore, religion and translation, based on the conviction that language and our linguistic concepts give evidence of and shape our ideas about the world and about ourselves.
Volume Editors: and
The nine contributions collected in this volume deal with clause linkage, focussing on asyndetic constructions that have been little researched in the area of the Ob-Yenisei region. The approaches are in-depth studies of particular languages and mostly based on original data collected in recent fieldworks or from corpora. Differences can be observed, among other things, in a more verbal or nominal use of converbs which take an important role in clause linkage strategies.
Author:
The main purpose of this dictionary is twofold. On the one hand, it provides the scholar of African studies with a tool to identify the possible Portuguese origin of terms present in African languages and, on the other, it offers those who are interested in Portuguese culture an overview of the presence of its lexicon in African languages. No doubt the Portuguese were among the first Europeans to explore the world outside of Europe, and as such they were also the first to introduce that world to European concepts and words.This book is the result of a long and detailed work on texts in African languages, as also shown by the rich bibliography in the dictionary.
Author:
The East Baltic languages are well known for their conservative phonology as compared to other Indo-European languages, which has led to a stereotype that the Balts developed in isolation without much contact with other speech communities. This book challenges that view, taking a deep dive into the East Baltic lexicon and peeling away the layers of prehistoric borrowings in the process. As well as significant contact events with known languages, the lexicon also reveals evidence of contact with unattested languages from which previous populations must have shifted.
When you use a metonymy to say “I’ve got a new set of wheels,” why do you refer to a car by means of the wheels rather any other part? Most cognitive linguist would agree that we prefer to talk about parts that are somehow salient, yet the seemingly simple notion of salience is entangled in a number of intricate problems related to how we understand and talk about the surrounding reality. Adopting the theoretic framework of Ronald Langacker’s Cognitive Grammar, this volume studies deep and general cognitive factors governing salience effects that influence the ways we use conceptual metonymies in phonic and sign languages.