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Volume Editors: Tamara Nair and Maria Inês Amaro
Citizenship is one of the most important legacies of human development. It raises the human status from a biological condition into a cultural, moral, political and rationalistic one. It is a constantly evolving process, which at each new turn, adds complexity to human existence.
After the breakthroughs of the eighteenth century, with the first steps in recognition of civil and political rights, and of the twentieth century with the advancement of social rights and the emergence of cultural and environmental rights, one could conclude that the twenty-first century would see an enlargement of citizenship ideas and ideals. Has this indeed happened? Where are we now when it comes to identifying ourselves as citizens?
Varying across several disciplines, this volume addresses the complexities of citizenship and our attempts to make sense of them.
Editors: Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan
In Equality and Anti-Discrimination: The Road to Equal Rights in China, Professors Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan collect experienced scholars in the field of anti-discrimination law to conduct deep discussions on the manifestations, causes, and solutions of discrimination issues in China. Since the reform and opening up in China the market economy and civil society have developed. However, many economic and social discriminations have also emerged and caused widespread social contradictions and legal dilemmas. In this book, equality rights and discrimination issues are investigated in a panoramic way from the perspective of law, and .insightful suggestions are made.
The authors believe that anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of Chinese law are carried out simultaneously with political changes and economic development. In this process, experts and scholars, public media, research institutions, and non-governmental organizations play important roles. The awakening of civil rights awareness and the emergence of rights protection actions for vulnerable groups are the sources of anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of law.
Editor: Yoram Dinstein
Associate Editor: Jeff Lahav
The Israel Yearbook on Human Rights- an annual published under the auspices of the Faculty of Law of Tel Aviv University since 1971- is devoted to publishing studies by distinguished scholars in Israel and other countries on human rights in peace and war, with particular emphasis on problems relevant to the State of Israel and the Jewish people. The Yearbook also incorporates documentary materials relating to Israel and the Administered Areas which are not otherwise available in English (including summaries of judicial decisions, compilations of legislative enactments and military proclamations).
This book comprehensively covers the entire scope of conflicting rights and duties of the fighting parties and international humanitarian relief actors in non-international armed conflicts, namely from the moment of the initiation of international humanitarian relief actions till their authorisation and throughout the consecutive stages of the delivery of relief. From the practice of frontline humanitarian negotiations, this book reconceptualizes how those rights and duties are coming into being and how compliance with agreements on humanitarian access and other international humanitarian law and international human rights norms can be ensured and/or their normativity can be strengthened.
This is a collection of international law materials relating to the Philippines: excerpts of treaties and declarations; international judicial and arbitral decisions; and Philippine constitutional clauses, statutes and Supreme Court decisions.

Today new theories abound, calling for comparative perspectives that look at international law through the lens of national and regional practice. This book engages with that challenge at a concrete level, e.g., how Marcos's human rights abuses were litigated abroad but never in Philippine courts, and how victim claims for reparations are, ironically, blocked by the Philippine Government citing the Filipino people’s competing claims over Marcos's ill-gotten wealth. It retells Philippine history using international law, and re-examines international law using the Philippine experience.
This volume offers a series of short and highly self-reflective essays by leading international lawyers on the relation between international law and crises. It particularly shows that international law shapes the crises that it addresses as much as it is shaped by them. It critically evaluates the modes of intervention of international law in the problems of the world. Together these essays provide a unique stocktaking about the role, limits, and potential of international law as well as the worlds that are imagined through international lawyers’ vocabularies.
From Indigenous Australians to the American Civil War
This book offers a culture-by-culture account of various unique restrictions placed on warfare over time, in a bid to demonstrate the underlying humanity often accompanying the horrors of war. It offers the first systematic exploration of Indigenous Australian laws of war, relaying decades of experience in communities. Containing essays by a range of laws of war academics and practitioners, this volume is a starting point in a new debate on the question: how international is international humanitarian law?
During the Covid-19 pandemic, the home as a workplace became a widely discussed topic. However, for almost 300 million workers around the world, paid work from home was not news. Home-Based Work and Home-Based Workers (1800-2021) includes contributions from scholars, activists and artists addressing the past and present conditions of home-based work. They discuss the institutional and legal histories of regulations for these workers, their modes of organization and resistance, as well as providing new insights on contemporary home-based work in both traditional and developing sectors.

Contributors are: Jane Barrett, Janine Berg, Eloisa Betti, Chris Bonner, Eileen Boris, Patricia Coñoman Carrilo, Janhavi Dave, Saniye Dedeoğlu, Laura K Ekholm, Jenna Harvey, Frida Hållander, K. Kalpana, Srabani Maitra, Indrani Mazumdar, Gabriela Mitidieri, Silke Neunsinger, Malin Nilsson, Narumol Nirathron, Åsa Norman, Leda Papastefanaki, Archana Prasad, Maria Tamboukou, Nina Trige Andersen, and Marlese von Broembsen.
Author: Anna Muś
In The Political Potential of Upper Silesian Ethnoregionalist Movement: A Study in Ethnic Identity and Political Behaviours of Upper Silesians Anna Muś offers a study on the phenomenon of ethnoregionalism in one of the regions in Poland. Since 1945, ethnopolitics in Poland have been based on the so-called assumption of the ethnic homogeneity of the Polish nation. Even the transformation of the political system to a fully democratic one in 1989 did not truly change it. However, over the last three decades, we can observe growing discontent in Upper Silesia and the politicisation of Silesian ethnicity. This is happening in a region with its own history of autonomy and culturally diversified society, where an ethnoregionalist political movement appeared already in 1989.
Author: Carol Chi Ngang
In The Right to Development in Africa, Carol Chi Ngang provides a conceptual analysis of the human right to development with a decolonial critique of the requirement to have recourse to development cooperation as a mechanism for its realisation. In his argumentation, the setbacks to development in Africa are not necessarily caused by the absence of development assistance but principally as a result of the lack of an operational model to steer the processes for development towards the highest attainable standard of living for the peoples of Africa. Basing on the decolonial and capability theories, he posits for a shift in development thinking from dependence on development assistance to an alternative model suited to Africa, which he defines as the right to development governance.