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Editor / Translator: Oliver Kahl
ʿAlī ibn Sahl Rabban aṭ-Ṭabarī's Indian Books, completed in the year 850 CE as an appendix to his medico-philosophical chef-d'œuvre "Paradise of Wisdom", belong to the most remarkable texts in Arabic scientific literature. The Indian Books offer a unique, interpretative summary of the main tenets of Ayurvedic medicine, as understood by Arabic-speaking scholars on the basis of now lost translations from Sanskrit. The present book centres around a critical edition and annotated translation of this crucial text, framed by a detailed introduction and extensive glossaries of terms. Ṭabarī's learned exposé of Ayurveda also throws a more nuanced light on the allegedly uncontested supremacy of Greek humoralism in 9th-century Arabic medicine.
Editor: Philip Major
Edmund Waller (1606–1687): New Perspectives reappraises the life and works of an important but neglected seventeenth-century English poet. Admired at court in the 1630s and at the Restoration, Waller made a deep impression on contemporary poetry: his collection of Poems (1645) was widely acclaimed and had an ‘extraordinary impact’ on future poets. The book investigates, among other things, Waller’s political views on affairs of state, his social and literary interactions with younger poets, his friendship with John Evelyn while in exile, his technical poetic innovations, his rivalry with Andrew Marvell, his elegies, and his contemporary and posthumous reputation.

The contributors are Warren Chernaik, Daniel Cook, Stephen Deng, Martin Dzelzainis, Richard Hillyer, Philip Major, Michael P. Parker, Tessie Prakas, Geoffrey Smith, Thomas Ward, and Gillian Wright.
A Comparative Study of Four National Literary Traditions
Author: Jean Kommers
This literary analysis of the representation of ‘Gypsies’ in juvenile literature is unique in its comparative scope, as well as in the special attention to rare pre-1850 narratives, the period in which juvenile literature developed as a specific genre. Most studies on the subject are about one national literary tradition or confined to a limited period. In this study Dutch, English, French and German texts are analysed and discussed with reference to main academic publications on the subject. Emphasis is on the rich variation in narrative presentations, rather than on an inventory of images or prejudices. An important topic is the fundamental difference between early English and German narratives. Important because of the wide dissemination of German stories.
Textual, Visual and Musical Receptions of Horace from the 15th to the 18th Century
This volume explores various perceptions, adaptations and appropriations of both the personality and the writings of Horace in the Early Modern age. The fifteen essays of this book are devoted to uncharted facets of the reception of Horace and thus substantially broaden our picture of the Horatian tradition. Special attention is given to the legacy of Horace in the visual arts and in music, beyond the domain of letters. By focusing on the multiple channels, through which the influence of Horace was felt and transported, this volume aims to present instances of the Horatian heritage across the media and to stimulate a more thorough reflection on an interdisciplinary and multi-medial approach to the exceptionally rich and variegated afterlife of Horace.

Contributors include: Veronica Brandis, Philippe Canguilhem, Giacomo Comiati, Karl A.E. Enenkel, Carolin A. Giere, Inga Mai Groote, Luke B.T. Houghton, Chris Joby, Marc Laureys, Grantley McDonald, Lukas Reddemann, Bernd Roling, Robert Seidel, Marcela Slavíková, Paul J. Smith, and Tijana Žakula.
Volume Editor: Lucyna Harmon
The viscerally haunting and politically disturbing Painted Bird, the most famous novel by the Polish-American writer, Jerzy Kosinski, finally receives a long overdue fresh scientific perspective: a truly insightful study of linguistic and cultural controversy in translation against the benchmark of a tailor-made iron-clad methodology of such concepts as involved culture, detached culture and the universe of the opus. The study presents the kaleidoscopic cross section of renditions into as many as thirteen languages, making it a pioneering elaboration of a macrocosm of the afterlife of a translated novel and a tour de force of comparative translation studies. The dark contents of the work, heavily loaded with political and moral issues, vulnerable to shifts and refractions in the process of translation, have been analysed, unaffected by ideological sway, debunking any persistent myths about Kosinski’s harrowing work.
Serendipities in the Production of Danish Islams
Author: Jesper Petersen
In the last decade a number of women-led mosques have emerged in Europe and North America. In The Making of a Mosque with Female Imams Jesper Petersen documents the serendipitous, yet predictable, emergence of the Mariam Mosque in Copenhagen. The study first demonstrates that individuals’ facing the unpredictable plays a decisive role in social processes. This leads to an investigation of how serendipities are erased when narratives are erected retrospectively in the form of commodified products, autobiographical narratives, and research. Furthermore, Petersen conceptualizes non-Muslims’ theological productions of Islam – Islam without the worship of Allah, so to speak – and demonstrates how this influences Muslim productions of Islam.
This is the first complete study of the relationship between Retranslation and Reception. Although many translation scholars have cited Reception Theory in their work, this is the first systematic study of its relationship to Retranslation. The book starts from the hypothesis that frequent retranslations of the same literary text into the same language may be indicative of its impact in the target culture. The volume encompasses both theory and practical analysis of Retranslation and Reception as mutually dependent concepts. The sixteen chapters relate the translations analysed to their socio-historical contexts in order to assess the impact that they have had on the target culture in terms of the reception of the authors studied, and also explore the relationship that may exist between the appearance of new translations and historical, social or cultural changes.
Volume Editors: Myrto Veikou and Ingela Nilsson
“Space Matters!” claimed Doreen Massey and John Allen at the heart of the Spatial Turn developments (1984). Compensating a four-decades shortfall, this collective volume is the first reader in Byzantine spatial studies. It contextualizes the spatial turn in historical studies by means of interdisciplinary dialogue. An introduction offers an up-to-date state of the art. Twenty-nine case studies provide a wide range of different conceptualizations of space in Byzantine culture articulated in a single collection through a variety of topics and approaches. An afterword frames the future challenges of Byzantine spatial studies in a changing world where space is a claim and a precarious social value.
Contributors are Ilias Anagnostakis, Alexander Beihammer, Helena Bodin, Darlene L. Brooks Hedstrom, Béatrice Caseau Chevallier, Paolo Cesaretti, Michael J. Decker, Veronica della Dora, Rico Franses, Sauro Gelichi, Adam J. Goldwyn, Basema Hamarneh, Richard Hodges, Brad Hostetler, Adam Izdebski, Liz James, P. Nick Kardulias, Isabel Kimmelfield, Tonia Kiousopoulou, Johannes Koder, Derek Krueger, Tomasz Labuk, Maria Leontsini, Yulia Mantova, Charis Messis, Konstantinos Moustakas, Margaret Mullett, Ingela Nilsson, Robert G. Ousterhout, Georgios Pallis, Myrto Veikou, Joanita Vroom, David Westberg, and Enrico Zanini.
Author: Tom Brass
The focus of this volume is on political discourse about the pattern and desirability of economic development, and how/why historical interpretations of social phenomena connected to this systemic process alter. It is a trajectory pursued here with reference to the materialism of Marxism, via the mid-nineteenth century ideas about race, through the development decade, the ‘cultural turn’, debates about modes of production and their respective labour regimes, culminating in the role played by immigration before and after the Brexit referendum. Also examined is the trajectory followed by travel writing, and how many of its core assumptions overlap with those made in the social sciences and development studies. The object is to account for the way concepts informing these trajectories do or do not alter.
Volume Editors: Bergur Rønne Moberg and David Damrosch
This pathbreaking collection explores a new concept in world literature studies. Going beyond the binary opposition of “major” and “minor” literatures, the ultraminor encompasses the literatures of smaller but vibrant regional and linguistic communities. Using cases as varied as the literatures of Malta, Mauritius, and the Faroe Islands, contemporary Nahuatl novels, Kafka in Prague, and Shakespeare in Naples, the ten essays in this volume take up questions of scale and circulation, the interplay of languages and dialects, and ultraminor writers’ resistance to translation and their reliance on it. Ultraminor World Literatures will be of interests to students and scholars of comparative and world literature and to anyone concerned with the ongoing life of unique cultural communities around the world.