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New Light on Acts 2-8 and the Link Between Spiritual and Economic Transformation
Traditional exegesis divides scripture into two distinct economic models: the OT (Hebrew) model of blessing with a “surplus of prosperity”, and the NT (Christian) model of economic collectivism with “all things in common”. Using an economic perspective as an exegetical tool, the author demonstrates that this differentiation is an artificial construct. In particular, he argues that various NT Greek words and phrases in Acts, which have been rendered to describe acts of charity, should be reinterpreted to depict overtly commercial activities, including the possibility of a banking operation at the heart of the primitive church that posed a serious political and economic threat to the Jewish elite in first-century Jerusalem.
Outlines and Challenges for Catholic Theology Today. Documentation of the INSeCT Conferences in Manila 2019 and Vienna 2020
This volume documents two international conferences held as part of the global theological research program „A Kairos for Catholic Theology: Serving the Church – Serving the World“ of the International Network of Societies for Catholic Theology (INSeCT). The 2019 intercontinental conference in Manila was dedicated to European-Asian dialogue and gathered contributions on peace, justice, democracy and political culture, ecology, family and gender justice. The 2020 European Conference in Vienna was dedicated to the contribution of multicultural and multi-religious experienced Europe to the solution of the current global challenges in church and society.
A Commentary Based on the Text of Codex Alexandrinus
This commentary on Deuteronomion is based on Codex Alexandrinus, the single best complete witness to the Old Greek. It features a new transcription of the manuscript with a fresh translation that treats Deuteronomion as a sacred text that would have been read, studied, and cherished in a worshipping community. Notations of important variants with the other key manuscripts, such as p848, p963, and B (Vaticanus), appear regularly. This commentary represents an interpretative adventure, intentionally giving room for varied ancient reader-responses, and accordingly it functions within several literary spaces. First, it recognizes the substantial intratextual features between the book’s narrative framing and its legal materials. Deuteronomion is also read in its hypotextual relation with the Pentateuch’s other narratives and legal materials, chiefly within Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers. Sensitivity to the Greek linguistic climate, the so-called koine Greek, is another space. Finally, and most distinctively, this commentary adds to its reading the many voices who read and used Deuteronomy, in either Hebrew or Greek forms, from the late Second Temple Period.
This edition contains quaestiones 1-5 of book III of the commentary on the Sentences, by Marsilius of Inghen (†1396), the founding rector and first doctor of theology of the University of Heidelberg. These questions are devoted to the Christology, Mariology, and Trinitology, and deal with the issue of the Incarnation of Christ, with quaestiones 1-3 considering it in relation to the individual Persons of the Trinity, and quaestiones 4-5 in relation to the Blessed Virgin Mary. In all questions, Marsilius advocates the via media of sound faith, even above any school traditions.
This issue takes an inclusive approach to the multidimensional topic of Mediterranean movement, as the themes to be discussed include migration, trade, traveling objects, knowledge exchange, and dissemination of books. The case studies demonstrate the impact of movement on the processes of identity building, whether social, cultural, or religious. Apart from textual sources, the articles included in this issue explore the movement of objects that are characterised by temporal continuity, embodying a prior existence with lingering effects. As objects transform through time and space, so do the values and functions attributed to them. The process of mapping out itineraries of value in the realm of the material allows us to grasp the nature of a given social formation through the shape and meaning taken on by them. It also provides insights into the nature of dynamic synergy between the world of material objects and the realm of beliefs, knowledge, and identities.
Der Band bietet 94 Briefe aus der Korrespondenz Bucers von Januar bis Juli 1534. Hier setzt sich die internationale Perspektive fort, die seit Mitte 1533 zu beobachten ist. Die evangelischen Korrespondenten betrachten die europapolitische Bündnispolitik skeptisch: Bucer rechnet im Januar 1534 damit, dass Papst Clemens VI. den englischen König Heinrich VIII. an sich binden wird, während die evangelischen Fürsten im Reich noch versuchen, mit Heinrich ein Bündnis zu schließen. Anfang Februar schätzt Bucer den französischen König milder ein, mit Sorge sieht er jedoch die Bemühungen Philipps von Hessen um Franz I.
Im Blick auf die Schweiz versucht Bucer in Schaffhausen auch 1534 im Abendmahlsstreit der Ortsprediger zu vermitteln. Die Korrespondenz mit den Züricher Kollegen kreist um die innerevangelische Auseinandersetzung um die Sakramentstheologie und in diesem Zusammenhang die Person Luthers. Seit dem achttägigen Besuch Bucers bei den Blarers in Konstanz im April 1533 gewinnt der Plan Gestalt, eine Ausbildungsstätte für den theologischen Nachwuchs in Straßburg zu errichten. Hinsichtlich der Einführung der Reformation in Württemberg skizziert Bucer in einem Schreiben an Philipp von Hessen und Ulrich von Württemberg sein Konzept, in dessen Zentrum die friedliche Koexistenz der evangelischen Positionen steht. Seltene Einblicke gewährt die Korrespondenz in Bucers Familienleben.