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Mill’s Principle of Utility: Origins, Proof, and Implications is a defense of John Stuart Mill’s utilitarianism with a particular emphasis on his proof of the principle of utility. Supplemented by a comprehensive historical background as well as salient philosophical assumptions and implications, its primary contribution is an analysis, interpretation, and defense of the controversial proof, which has yet to attract a scholarly consensus on how it works and whether it succeeds. The overarching aim of the book is the vindication of Mill’s reasoning in the proof and the restoration of his reputation as one of the clearest thinkers of his time.
Volume Editor: James Risser
John Sallis has been at the cutting edge of the Continental philosophical tradition for almost half a century, and it is largely due to his contributions that we have come to understand “Continental” as designating an original philosophical, not a geographical, tradition. His work, with its uncommon scholarly rigor, has come to define the best of that tradition and to expand its horizons in creative ways through a genuine philosophical imagination.
The essays gathered here are dedicated to assessing Sallis’ contribution and to indicating some of the ways in which his works might shape the future of philosophy.
The Anthology of the Works of Ugo Spirito captures the trajectory of Ugo Spirito’s complex body of thought that spanned more than fifty years, from 1921 to 1977. While confronting difficult contemporary problems related to philosophy and science, liberalism and socialism, fascism and communism, and other economic and ideological aspects such as corporativism and democracy, Spirito revealed a persistent desire to reach truth and the absolute. Yet, he also voiced his failure to remain faithful to any philosophical or political system considered definitive and unquestionable. Unable to reach incontrovertibility, he consistently dissected the prevailing contemporary ideas and systems, including his own beliefs, developing at the same time the ‘antinomic’ approach, a method of critical analysis that undermined any truth reputed irrefutable. Today, Spirito stands as one of most anti-conformist Italian thinkers for he challenged the certainties of modern thought.
This book highlights the legacy of the Lvov-Warsaw School in broadly understood contemporary philosophy of language. Fundamental methodological issues, important topics in syntax, semantics and pragmatics (such as modern Categorial Grammar, theories of truth, game-theoretical semantics, and argumentation theory) are tracked down to their origins in the Lvov-Warsaw School, and – the other way round – modern renderings of the ideas expressed by Kazimierz Ajdukiewicz, Tadeusz Kotarbiński, Stanisław Leśniewski, Jan Łukasiewicz, Alfred Tarski, Kazimierz Twardowski, and other members of the School are presented. Among contributors there are philosophers, logicians, formal linguists and other specialists from France, Italy, Poland, and Spain.
Karel Kosík (1926–2003) was one of the most remarkable Czech Marxist philosophers of the twentieth century. His reputation as a creative thinker is owed largely to his philosophical ‘blockbuster’ Dialectics of the Concrete, first published in Czechoslovakia in 1963. In reintroducing Kosík’s philosophy to English-speaking readers, we show that Kosík’s work is important not only as a leading intellectual document of the Prague Spring, but also as an original theoretical contribution with international impact that sheds light on the meaning of labour and praxis, cognition and economic structure, and revolution and the crises of modernity.

Contributors include: Ian Angus, Siyaves Azeri, Vít Bartoš, Jan Černý, Joseph Grim Feinberg, Diana Fuentes, Gabriella Fusi, Tomáš Hermann, Tomáš Hříbek, Xiaohan Huang, Peter Hudis, Petr Kužel, Ivan Landa, Michael Löwy, Jan Mervart, Anselm K. Min, Tom Rockmore, Francesco Tava, and Xinruo Zhang.
Through a discussion with current perspectives in philosophy of history – especially with a critical approach to Paul Ricœur’s work – and a rigorous reading of Karl Marx’s oeuvre, Karl Marx, Historian of Social Times and Spaces proposes an interpretation of Marx's concept and method of historical knowledge. In this sense the examination of Marx's concepts of social space and social time serve to highlight the possibilities of his work in terms of the explanation of the dynamics of complex multilinear development of human societies and of capitalism in particular.
Translator: Nathaniel Thomas
The German-Austrian social theorist and philosopher Leo Kofler (1907–1995) represents what Oskar Negt once called ‘unmutilated, living Marxism’. Throughout his life he dealt with issues of history and modernity, Marxist philosophy and the critique of ideology, philosophical anthropology and aesthetics. In this volume, author and Kofler biographer Christoph Jünke elucidates the contours of his philosophy of praxis, traces an arc from the socialist classics to postmodernism, and outlines the socialist humanist thinker’s enduring relevance. The book also includes six essays by Leo Kofler published in English for the first time.

The main work was first published in German as Leo Koflers Philosophie der Praxis: Eine Einführung in sein Denken by Laika Verlag, 2015, ISBN 978-944233-33-8. Copyright by Laika Verlag.
Author: Uno Kōzō
Editor / Translator: Ken C. Kawashima
Kōzō Uno’s Theory of Crisis presents an unparalleled and systematic demonstration of the inevitability of crisis under the capitalist mode of production. Based on a radical re-interpretation of Marx’s Capital, Uno’s theory of crisis emphasizes ‘excess capital alongside surplus populations’ and ‘the commodification of labour power’ at the heart of Marx’s theory of crisis, and additionally provides a concise overview of capitalist crises from the stage of mercantilism to the imperialist stage of capitalism.
Included are two Appendix essays by Uno, which disentangle theoretical difficulties related to the theory of crisis in Marx’s Capital, and two original and contemporary essays by Professors Makoto Itoh and by Ken Kawashima and Gavin Walker.
This book was originally published in Japanese as Kyōkō-ron by Iwanami Shoten, 1953.

Abstract

This chapter takes up the charge that Mill commits the fallacy of composition in his proof of the principle of utility. This is the fallacy of assuming that what is true of the parts of a whole must therefore be true of the whole as well. It is a logical fallacy commonly committed in inferences from the attributes, properties, or characteristics of the parts of a whole to the attributes, properties, or characteristics of the corresponding whole. The following argument is an example: “Each word in this sentence is in the Oxford English Dictionary; therefore, this sentence is in the Oxford English Dictionary.” Mill allegedly commits the fallacy of composition in the third paragraph of the fourth chapter of Utilitarianism, where his reasoning can be paraphrased as follows: Each person’s happiness is desirable for (is a good to) the person whose happiness it is; therefore, the general happiness is desirable for (is a good to) the aggregate of all persons. Mill’s argument, paraphrased in this way and taken in isolation, appears on the face of it to commit the fallacy of composition. The primary aim of this chapter is to demonstrate that it does not.

In: Mill's Principle of Utility: Origins, Proof, and Implications

Abstract

This chapter absolves Mill of the charge that he equivocates on the word “desirable” in his proof, where he supposedly switches from a construal indicating ability or capacity to one establishing value, specifically in the process of inferring that which it is good to desire, or worthy of desire, from that which it is possible to desire, or able to be desired. The supposedly fallacious version of the argument can be summarized as follows: Whatever is desired is desirable (can be desired); happiness is desired; therefore, happiness is desirable (worthy of desire). This interpretation and the associated accusation are grounded in Mill’s analogic reasoning in comparing desires as evidence of desirability with seeing as evidence of visibility and hearing as evidence of audibility. Mill is thus taken to equivocate between the standard sense of “desirable” as a normative term analogous to “good” and an idiosyncratic sense of “desirable” as a descriptive term comparable to “visible” and “audible.”

In: Mill's Principle of Utility: Origins, Proof, and Implications