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This volume honors Prof. James R. Royse on the occasion of his seventy-fifth birthday and celebrates his scholarly achievement in the fields of New Testament textual criticism and Philonic studies. An introductory section contains a biographical notice on the honoratus and a complete list of his scholarly publications. Part one contains nine articles on New Testament textual criticism, focusing on methodological issues, difficult passages and various textual witnesses. Part two presents eight studies on the thought, writings, textual record, and reception of Philo of Alexandria. This wide-ranging collection of articles will introduce the reader to new findings in the scholarly fields to which Prof. Royse continues to make such an outstanding contribution.
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture

Abstract

The present article discusses etymological parallels between ancient Egyptian and Modern South Arabian languages (MSAL) and the possible presence of Egyptian lexical items in MSAL. Bidirectional lexical loans have been the object of much research between Northwest Semitic and Egyptian (Bates, 2004; Hoch, 1994), while Egyptian–Arabic lexical cognates and loans across the Arabian Peninsula have been recently demonstrated (Borg, 2019a, b). I show the parallel evolution of the Proto-Afroasiatic phonological system in Egyptian and MSAL through some proposed parallel etymologies, assuming that loans may deviate from the general rules, undergoing transformations due to speakers’ perceptions and phonological adaptation. The Egyptian provenance may explain the etymology of three MSAL words, a word for ‘incense’ (perhaps found also in Ugaritic), a word for ‘camel grunt’, and one for ‘canoe.’

In: The IOS Annual Volume 21. “Carrying a Torch to Distant Mountains”

Abstract

This article discusses the complex grammatical and typological properties of two regions in Galilee from a comparative areal perspective. The varieties investigated are the speech of (1) a dozen villages in the Jezreel Plain (Marǧ Ibn ʕĀmir) and (2) four Arab villages in the Hula Valley (Sahl al-Ḥūla) that no longer exist. Due to their juxtaposition between the Central Palestinian, Galilean, Lebanese, Syrian, Jordanian, and bedouin-type Shawi dialects, the Arabic varieties of the two regions can be regarded as transitional dialects. They show some typical bedouin traits, but also have some striking features in common with the sedentary dialects of neighboring regions: specifically, the dialect of the Hula Valley shares some characteristics with both the Syrian Ḥawrāni dialects and the sedentary dialects of southern Lebanon, while the dialect of Marǧ ibn ʕĀmir exhibits similarities with the dialects of northern and central Jordan as well as with the sedentary dialects spoken in the so-called Muṯallaṯ area to the south. Both regions are, of course, also linguistically linked to the other dialects of Galilee. In addition to providing notes on phonology, morphology, and syntax, the article briefly discusses the historical background and the degree of the bedouin influence, which is likely less significant than originally maintained. The final section presents four transcribed texts along with an English translation and linguistic commentary.

In: The IOS Annual Volume 21. “Carrying a Torch to Distant Mountains”