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Beyond World Literature
Author: Ottmar Ette
Beginning with Erich Auerbach’s reflections on the Goethean concept of World Literature, Ottmar Ette unfolds the theory and practice of Literatures of the World. Today, only those literary theories that are oriented upon a history of movement are still capable of doing justice to the confusing diversity of highly dynamic, worldwide transformations. This is because they examine transareal pathways in the field of literature. This volume captures literary processes of exchange and transformation between the Mediterranean, Atlantic and Pacific as well as the interplay of different ways of narrating space and time. Thus, this volume speaks from a fractal point of view and unfolds multiple perspectives. Literatures of the World allows the reader to think in different logical frameworks at the same time, therefore shaping our future on the basis of the diversity of humankind.
Why was anxiety such a major issue for Søren Kierkegaard and his contemporaries? This book revisits the “original” age of anxiety, the time and place where Kierkegaard’s ground-breaking thoughts on anxiety were formed. The pseudonym used by Kierkegaard in The Concept of Anxiety (1844), Vigilius Haufniensis, is Latin for “the watchman of Copenhagen.” A guiding question is what the vigilant Haufniensis might have observed in his city—and especially in the literary culture of his time and day? Exploring freedom in many forms, Kierkegaard and his contemporaries found combinations of fear and desire that have later been considered symptomatic of modernity.
Beckett’s Voices / Voicing Beckett uses ‘voice’ as a prism to investigate Samuel Beckett’s work across a range of texts, genres, and performance cultures. Twenty-one contributors, all members of the Samuel Beckett Working Group of the International Federation for Theatre Research, discuss the musicality of Beckett’s voices, the voice as ‘absent other’, the voices of the vulnerable, the cinematic voice, and enacted voices in performance and media. The volume engages not only with Beckett’s history and legacy, but also with many of the central theoretical issues in theatre studies as a whole. Featuring testimonies from Beckett practitioners as well as emerging and established scholars, it is emblematic of the thriving and diverse community that is twenty-first century Beckett Studies.

Contributors: Svetlana Antropova, Linda Ben-Zvi, Jonathan Bignell, Llewellyn Brown, Julie Campbell, Thirthankar Chakraborty, Laurens De Vos, Everett C. Frost, S. E. Gontarski, Mariko Hori Tanaka, Nicholas E. Johnson, Kumiko Kiuchi, Anna McMullan, Melissa Nolan, Cathal Quinn, Arthur Rose, Teresa Rosell Nicolás, Jürgen Siess, Anna Sigg, Yoshiko Takebe, Michiko Tsushima
Volume Editors: Sandra Dinter and Johanna Marquardt
Often thought of as a thing of the past, nationalism remains surprisingly resilient in the postcolonial era, especially since the concepts of multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism have lost authority in recent years. The contributions assembled in Nationalism and the Postcolonial examine various forms, representations, and consequences of past and present nationalisms in languages, popular culture, and literature in or associated with Australia, Canada, England, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Nigeria, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago Bringing together perspectives from linguistics, political science, cultural studies, and literary studies, the collection illustrates how postcolonial nationalism functions as a unifying mechanism of anti-colonial nation-building as well as a divisive force that can encourage discrimination and violence.

Contributors: Natascha Bing, Prachi Gupta, Ralf Haekel, Kathrin Härtl, Idreas Khandy, Theresa Krampe, Lukas Lammers, Arhea Marshall, Hannah Pardey, Sina Schuhmaier, Hanna Teichler, Michael Westphal
Volume Editors: Walter Bernhart and Axel Englund
Incompletion is an essential condition of cultural history, and particularly the idea of the fragment became a central element of Romantic art. Through its resistance to classicist ideals it continued being of high relevance to the various strands of modernist and contemporary aesthetics. The fourteen essays in this volume, based on the 2017 Stockholm conference of the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA), for the first time address incompletion in a wide range of literary and musical texts, from Baudelaire and Flaubert through Tolstoy and Henry James to Bachmann, Jelinek and Janet Frame, from Nietzsche and Chopin through Russolo and Puccini to Rihm and Kurtàg. Two further essays deal with topical general issues in the field of word and music studies.

Contributors:

Delia da Sousa Correa, The Open University, United Kingdom.
Peter Dayan, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Ivan Delazari, HSE University in St. Petersburg, Russia.
Rolf J. Goebel, The University of Alabama, USA.
Michael Halliwell, The University of Sydney, Australia.
Christin Hoene, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Ruth Jacobs, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Lawrence Kramer, Fordham University, USA.
Bernhard Kuhn, Bucknell University, USA.
Margaret Miner, The University of Illinois Chicago, USA.
Beate Schirrmacher, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
David Francis Urrows, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong.
Laura Vattano, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Erik Wallrup, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Werner Wolf, University of Graz, Austria.
Transnational Perspectives, Translation Processes, Scandinavian and Postcolonial Challenges
Examining the cultural dynamics of translation and transfer, Cultural Transfer Reconsideredproposes new insights into both epistemological and analytical questions raised in the research area of cultural transfer. Seeking to emphasize the creative processes of transfer, Steen Bille Jørgensen and Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink have invited specialized researchers to determine the role of structures and agents in the dynamics of cultural encounters. With its particular focus on the North, as opposed to the South, the volume problematizes national paradigms. Presenting various aspects of tri- and multilateral transfers involving Scandinavian countries, Cultural Transfer Reconsidered opens perspectives regarding the ways in which textual, intertextual and artistic practices, in particular, pave the way for postcolonial interrelatedness.

Contributors: Miriam Lay Brander, Petra Broomans, Michel Espagne, Karin Hoff, Steen Bille Jørgensen, Anne-Estelle Leguy, Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink, Walter Moser, Magnus Qvistgaard, Anna Sandberg, Udo Schöning, Wiebke Röben de Alencar Xavier
Author: Rafael Bernabe
Walt Whitman and His Caribbean Interlocutors: José Martí, C.L.R. James, and Pedro Mir explores the writings of Whitman (1819-1892) and of three Caribbean authors who engaged with them: the Cuban poet, essayist and revolutionary José Martí (1853-1895); the Trinidadian activist, historian and cultural critic C.L.R. James (1901-1989), and the Dominican poet Pedro Mir (1913-2000). Whitman and his Caribbean interlocutors are discussed against the background of the contradictions of capitalist modernity, as exemplified by the United States between the 1840s and the 1940s. Marx's exploration of the liberating and oppressive dimensions of capitalist expansion frames the discussion of each author and of Martí's, James's and Mir's responses to Whitman and, more generally, to North American capitalist and industrial civilisation and its imperial projections.
Volume Editors: Jürgen Barkhoff and Joep Leerssen
The articulation of collective identity by means of a stereotyped repertoire of exclusionary characterizations of Self and Other is one of the longest-standing literary traditions in Europe and as such has become part of a global modernity. Recently, this discourse of Othering and national stereotyping has gained fresh political virulence as a result of the rise of “Identity Politics”. What is more, this newly politicized self/other discourse has affected Europe itself as that continent has been weathering a series of economic and political crises in recent years. The present volume traces the conjunction between cultural and literary traditions and contemporary ideologies during the crisis of European multilateralism.

Contributors: Aelita Ambrulevičiūtė, Jürgen Barkhoff, Stefan Berger, Zrinka Blažević, Daniel Carey, Ana María Fraile, Wulf Kansteiner, Joep Leerssen, Hercules Millas, Zenonas Norkus, Aidan O’Malley, Raúl Sánchez Prieto, Karel Šima, Luc Van Doorslaer,Ruth Wodak
Author: Piero Boitani
Anagnorisis has been called ‘one of the great works of comparative literary criticism of our time’. It is a book that spans the millennia, the adventures of Ulysses in Homer and God’s mysterious appearance to Abraham in Genesis, down not only to Joyce’s Ulysses and Thomas Mann’s Joseph and his Brothers, but also to Dumas’ Count of Montecristo, Borges’s ‘The Immortal’, and Walcott's Omeros.
‘Anagnorisis’ means ‘recognition’. Aristotle defined it simply as ‘the passage from ignorance to knowledge’. But the knowledge one gains in anagnorisis is neither scientific nor abstract – it is living knowledge in the flesh, as Euripides’ Helen understood when, seeing her husband again after many years, she exclaimed: ‘to recognize those we love is a god.