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The Sea of Chronicles is an English translation of the ninth and tenth chapters of the historiographical work entitled Muḥīṭ al-tavārīkh by Muḥammad Amīn b. Mīrzā Muḥammad Zamān Bukhārī. The work is a valuable source in particular for the study of the late seventeenth-century Central Asian political, cultural and religious history.

The ninth chapter offers accounts of the Timurid, Abulkhayrid/Shaybanid and the first four Ashatrkhanid khans. The tenth chapter which is the most original and important chapter of the work presents a detailed account of the life and time of the last great Ashatkhanid ruler, Subḥān Qulī Khān (r. 1682–1702), revealing historical information essential for the study of the period and region.
In: The Sea of Chronicles (Muḥīṭ al-tavārīkh)
In: The Sea of Chronicles (Muḥīṭ al-tavārīkh)
In: The Sea of Chronicles (Muḥīṭ al-tavārīkh)
In: The Sea of Chronicles (Muḥīṭ al-tavārīkh)
In: Mawlana Rumi Review

Abstract

This article presents an English translation of the Persian account by Farīdūn Sipahsālār from his treatise Risāla-yi Sipahsālār on the life of Mawlānā Rūmī, written about half a century after the poet’s death by an individual who was a member of his circle. This work therefore provides a relatively early, perhaps first-hand, devotional account in prose of the funeral of Rūmī. This passage is excerpted from a forthcoming translation of Sipahsālār’s treatise by Muhammad Isa Waley.

In: Mawlana Rumi Review
In: Mawlana Rumi Review
In: Mawlana Rumi Review

Abstract

This article explores the idea of Metaphysical Time in the poetry of Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī against more general understandings of time and temporality in Sufi thought and Persian poetry. Various attitudes toward serial time and the subjective experience of past, present, and future are reflected in the poetry of not only Rūmī, but also ʽUmar Khayyām and Ḥāfiẓ. The philosophical approaches toward human temporality discussed here include sentient carpe diem, spiritual carpe diem, and pursuit of the Metaphysical Moment, or Time’s Currency (naqd-i waqt). To understand this, we must examine Rūmī’s understanding of the notion of the Sufi as ‘the son of time’ (Ibn al-waqt), along with the concomitant or related ideas in Rūmī’s poetry of ‘the Father of Time’ (abū ‘l-waqt) and ‘the Brethren of Time’ (ikhwān al-waqt), and the Prophet’s Hadith, ‘I have a time with God….’. The article elaborates on some remarkable homologies between the concepts of time and the ‘Industrious Man’ in the poetry of Mawlānā Rūmī and William Blake, and how the attraction of divine love pulls the lover out of Time into the realm of Eternity, and how love subverts rational categories of time and space, which become illusory and vanish in the mystical experience of unity. Aldous Huxley’s distinction between the Philosophers of Time and the Philosophers of Eternity is also explored in relation to Rūmī’s thinking.

In: Mawlana Rumi Review