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Networks of Refugees from Nazi Germany

Continuities, Reorientations, and Collaborations in Exile

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Edited by Helga Schreckenberger

This volume focuses on coalitions and collaborations formed by refugees from Nazi Germany in their host countries. Exile from Nazi Germany was a global phenomenon involving the expulsion and displacement of entire families, organizations, and communities. While forced emigration inevitable meant loss of familiar structures and surroundings, successful integration into often very foreign cultures was possible due to the exiles’ ability to access and/or establish networks. By focusing on such networks rather than on individual experiences, the contributions in this volume provide a complex and nuanced analysis of the multifaceted, interacting factors of the exile experience. This approach connects the NS-exile to other forms of displacement and persecution and locates it within the ruptures of civilization dominating the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Contributors are: Dieter Adolph, Jacob Boas, Margit Franz, Katherine Holland, Birgit Maier-Katkin Leonie Marx, Wolfgang Mieder, Thomas Schneider, Helga Schreckenberger, Swen Steinberg, Karina von Tippelskirch, Jörg Thunecke, Jacqueline Vansant, and Veronika Zwerger

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Tina Marie Boyer

In The Giant Hero in Medieval Literature Tina Boyer counters the monstrous status of giants by arguing that they are more broadly legible than traditionally believed. Building on an initial analysis of St. Augustine’s City of God, Bernard of Clairvaux’s deliberations on monsters and marvels, and readings in Tomasin von Zerclaere’s Welsche Gast provide insights into the spectrum of antagonistic and heroic roles that giants play in the courtly realm. This approach places the figure of the giant within the cultural and religious confines of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries and allows an in-depth analysis of epics and romances through political, social, religious, and gender identities tied to the figure of the giant. Sources range from German to French, English, and Iberian works.

Exile and Gender I

Literature and the Press

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Edited by Charmian Brinson and Andrea Hammel

This new volume in the series Yearbook of the Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies, entitled Exile and Gender: Literature and the Press, edited by Charmian Brinson and Andrea Hammel, focuses on the work of exiled women writers and journalists as well as on gendered representations in the writing of both male and female exiled writers. The contributions are in English or German. The seventeen contributions set out to both celebrate and critically examine the concepts of gender and sexuality in exile in a wide range of texts by well-known and lesser known authors, and throw light on many different aspects of gendered authorship and gendered relations. Our volume also looks at two bibliographic rarities: exile newspapers intended for and directed at a female readership.

Dieser neue Band der Serie Yearbook of the Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies mit dem Titel Exile and Gender I: Literature and the Press, herausgegeben von Charmian Brinson und Andrea Hammel, enthält Beiträge zu den Werken exilierter Schriftstellerinnen und Journalistinnen und zu geschlechtsspezifischen Darstellungen in den Texten von Exilschriftstellern und Exilschriftstellerinnen. Die Beiträge sind entweder in deutscher oder englischer Sprache. Die siebzehn Beiträge haben zum Ziel, die Erfolge dieser SchriftstellerInnen zu feiern und die Gender- und Sexualitätskonzepte in den Werken von bekannten und weniger bekannten Schreibenden kritisch zu untersuchen. Weitere Themen sind das weibliche Schreiben und die Beziehungen der Geschlechter im Exil. Der Band bespricht auch bibliografische Neuheiten: Exilzeitschriften, die von und für Exilantinnen publiziert wurden.

Contributors are: Hiltrud Arens, Montserrat Bascoy Lamelas, Wiebke von Bernstorff, Charmian Brinson, Rosa Marta Gomez Pato, Andrea Hammel, Birgit Maier-Katkin, Trinidad Marin Villora, Aine McGillicuddy, Katharina Prager, Ester Saletta, Rose Sillars, Jörg Thunecke, Christine Ujma, Benedikt Wolf, Amira Zmiric, Veronika Zwerger.

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Marjolijn Storm

Agatha Christie is one of the most popular and most translated authors of all time. Yet there is little academic work on her writing. This book sets out to rectify this.
No matter where in the world you are, Hercule Poirot is a name that conjures up certain associations. The detailed analysis of the original text, three German and two Dutch translations of The Mysterious Affair at Styles however shows that his depiction differs immensely between the individual texts. In the course of this book, reasons for these differences are found via the analysis of the shifts of status of Agatha Christie as an author, of detective fiction and of translations from English in Germany and the Netherlands. During this exploration the discovery will be made that, when translated, escapist literature such as Christie’s detective fiction actually becomes a highly political affair.

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines

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Katharina Prager

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This essay explores the manifold, but seldom considered interactions between exile, gender and life writing. Since its beginnings, Exile Studies has worked with life-writing practices, but its use of biographical conventions has frequently been left unquestioned. Early research deemed gender to be irrelevant, while the autobiographical discourse of exiles reinforced stereotypical assumptions about men and women. Sustained engagement with women’s history and gender theory has altered and expanded concepts of exile and biography. At the same time, biographical approaches to exile can offer insightful, transcultural perspectives for Gender Studies.


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Benedikt Wolf

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In Heinrich Mann’s novel The Youth of King Henri Quatre the fight of enlightened tolerance against barbarism appears to be fundamentally connected to a masculine triumph over femininity. This connection can be explained out of the context of exiled German discourses about the alleged link between fascism and homosexuality. The reading of Mann’s novel proposed here starts from the male figure of crisis, the homosexual Henri III, and examines in which ways this figure of crisis of the old is at the same time a figure of transition to the new and thus constitutive of Henri IV’s path to humanity.


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Hiltrud Arens

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This essay examines how the historical novel Exil der frechen Frauen by Robert Cohen (2009) portrays three female protagonists – Olga Benario, Maria Osten, and Ruth Rewald – within a complex and multilayered perspective of the period 1928–1942. Cohen’s text is situated at the meeting point of gender and exile studies, encompassing historical and biographical, geo-political and gender-specific topoi, which offer alternative, nuanced views on gendered identity and authorship in exile. The essay focuses on links among gender and notions of friendship, love, and movement, and raises questions about gendered communication and writing, and the complexities of writing about war, the Holocaust, and exile.


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Rose Sillars

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Claiming to write the fate of the alienated and dispossessed, geographical as well as existential, in authentic terms, Vicki Baum presented her large popular audience with credible pictures of the exiled state. However, closer examination of her novels reveals that her own expatriation failed to modify esoteric ideas carried over from the Weimar years, which emphasised the symbolic at the expense of the lived experience, trivialising the exile lives which surrounded her.