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Volume Editor: Peter Pormann
This collection of article presents cutting-edge scholarship in Hippocratic studies in English from an international range of experts. It pays special attention to the commentary tradition, notably in Syriac and Arabic, and its relevance to the constitution and interpretation of works in the Hippocratic Corpus. It presents new evidence from hitherto unpublished sources, including Greek papyri and Syriac and Arabic manuscripts. It encompasses not only the classical period (and notably Galen), but also tackles evidence from the medieval and Renaissance periods.

Contributors are: Elizabeth Craik, David Leith, Tommaso Raiola, Jacques Jouanna, Caroline Magdelaine, Jean-Michel Mouton, Peter N. Singer, R. J. Hankinson, Ralph M. Rosen, Daniela Manetti, Mathias Witt, Amneris Roselli, Véronique Boudon-Millot, Sabrina Grimaudo, Giulia Ecca, Kamran I. Karimullah, María Teresa Santamaría Hernández, and Jesús Ángel y Espinós.
This book explores the notebooks of S. Belle, an astrologer who lived in late fifteenth-century France, as a case study of late medieval astrological practice. These notebooks combine astrological doctrine, a large collection of horoscopes, an almanac, and three complete judgements of nativities. By studying Belle’s methods, processes of learning, and practices, this book contributes to a better understanding of the internal architecture of astrology in the pre-modern world; this includes its techniques, methodologies, goals, transmission, and development throughout history. It offers an internalist view of the practice of astrology, as a counterpart to the existing research into astrology’s social and cultural impact.
Editor: Aurora Panzica
Nicole Oresme was one of the most original and influential thinkers of the fourteenth century. He is best known for his mathematical discoveries, his economic theories, as well as his vernacular translations of cosmological and ethical texts that were undertaken at the request of King Charles V. This volume sheds light on the beginning of Oresme's scientific activity at the University of Paris (ca. 1340 – ca. 1350), a period of his intellectual career about which little is known. Over the course of this decade, Oresme lectured on many Aristotelian texts on natural philosophy, such as the Physics, On the Heavens, On generation and corruption, Meteorology, and On the Soul. Oresme's commentaries on Aristotle's Meteorology count among his only unpublished texts. This volume presents the first critical edition of books I-II.10 of the second redaction of Oresme's Questions on Meteorology. The edition is preceded by a historical and philological introduction that discusses the context of Oresme’s scientific career and examines the manuscript tradition.
Editor: Sacha Stern
Calendars in the Making investigates the origins of calendars we are most familiar with today, yet whose early histories, in the Roman and medieval periods, are still shrouded in obscurity. It examines when the seven-day week was standardized and first used for dating and time reckoning, in Jewish and other constituencies of the Roman Empire; how the Christian liturgical calendar was constructed in early medieval Europe; and how and when the Islamic calendar was instituted. The volume includes studies of Roman provincial calendars, medieval Persian calendar reforms, and medieval Jewish calendar cycles. Edited by Sacha Stern, it presents the original research of a team of leading experts in the field.

Contributors are: François de Blois, Ilaria Bultrighini, Sacha Stern, Johannes Thomann, Nadia Vidro, Immo Warntjes.
In: Calendars in the Making: The Origins of Calendars from the Roman Empire to the Later Middle Ages
In: Calendars in the Making: The Origins of Calendars from the Roman Empire to the Later Middle Ages
In: Calendars in the Making: The Origins of Calendars from the Roman Empire to the Later Middle Ages
In: Calendars in the Making: The Origins of Calendars from the Roman Empire to the Later Middle Ages