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This book contains twenty essays on Italian Renaissance humanism, universities, and Jesuit education in three equal parts. The book defines Renaissance humanism, then studies biblical humanism, humanistic education in Venice, the pioneering historian of humanism Georg Voigt, and Paul Oskar Kristeller. The middle section discusses Italian universities, the sports played by university students, a famous law professor, and the controversy over the immortality of the soul. The last section analyses Jesuit education: the culture of the Jesuit teacher, the philosophy curriculum, attitudes toward Erasmus and Juan Luis Vives, and the education of a cardinal. Most essays were published between 2006 and 2019; one is new.
At the Heart of the Catholic Reformation in the Low Countries (16th - 17th centuries)
Often considered as the first phenomenon of mass media in history, the use of books and prints by Protestants has been widely studied and has generated a rich and plentiful bibliography. In contrast, the production and use of these supports by the partisans of the Counter-Reformation have not received the attention they deserve, especially in the context of the Low Countries.

The twelve contributors provide new perspectives on the efficacy of the handpress book industry to support the Catholic strategy of the Spanish Low Countries and underlines the mutually beneficial relationship between proponents of the Counter-Reformation and the typographic world. It is therefore also an important contribution to our understanding of sociocultural and socioeconomic background of the Catholic Netherlands.
This is the first study of Jacobean Scotland's largest library: the collection assembled over several generations by the Lindsays of Balcarres. It challenges prior understandings of pre-Union Scotland's book culture, presents the catalogue of a collection of international importance for the first time, and recovers the intellectual history behind this "Great Bibliotheck".
The volume includes essays on the history of the library to the Restoration (Jane Stevenson) and from Restoration to Enlightenment (Kelsey Jackson Williams) as well as a detailed discussion of the library's reconstruction (William Zachs and Jackson Williams), a full catalogue, and appendices.
Critical Edition with Introduction, Translation and Notes
Author: Juan Luis Vives
Editor / Translator: David J. Walker
The De concordia, published by Juan Luis Vives in 1529 and dedicated to the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V, is a comprehensive analysis of the social and political problems which were then afflicting Europe. It is the only such analysis undertaken by any of the Renaissance humanists.
The De concordia merits a much more important place in Vives’ oeuvre than scholars have hitherto given it. It is structured around the Augustinian concept of concordia and its antithesis, discordia. As such, it is an explicit attempt to understand current history in metaphysical terms. Vives’ intention is not to give strategic or tactical advice to Charles V, but to examine the general disorder of Europe with a view to determining its fundamental nature and significance. This is the first critical edition of the De concordia and the first English translation.
Community Formation in the Early Modern World of Learning and Science
Memory and Identity in the Learned World offers a detailed and varied account of community formation in the early modern world of learning and science. The book traces how collective identity, institutional memory and modes of remembrance helped to shape learned and scientific communities.

The case studies in this book analyse at how learned communities and individuals presented and represented themselves, for example in letters, biographies, histories, journals, opera omnia, monuments, academic travels and memorials. By bringing together the perspectives of historians of literature, scholarship, universities, science, and art, this volume studies knowledge communities by looking at the centrality of collective identity and memory in their formations and reformations.

Contributors include Lieke van Deinsen, Karl Enenkel, Constance Hardesty, Paul Hulsenboom, Dirk van Miert, Alan Moss, Richard Kirwan, Koen Scholten, Floris Solleveld, and Esther M. Villegas de la Torre.
Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola’s Encounter with Scholastic Philosophy
Author: Amos Edelheit
This study explains how one of the remarkable thinkers of the Italian Renaissance, Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463-1494), broke new ground by engaging with the scholastic tradition while maintaining his ‘humanist’ sensibilities. A central claim of the monograph is that Pico was a ‘philosopher at the crossroads’, whose sophisticated reading of numerous scholastic thinkers enabled him to advance a different conception of philosophy. The scholastic background to Pico’s work has been neglected by historians of the period. This omission has served to create not only an unreliable portrait of Pico’s thought, but a more general ignorance of the dynamism of scholastic thought in late fifteenth-century Italy. The books argues that these deficiencies of modern scholarship stand in need of correction.
At the foundation of international law lies the notion of ius gentium or right of peoples, an idea that fully came into its own with the discovery of America and the effort to resolve the moral issues posed by the Spanish presence. Once Vitoria broadened the Augustinian concept of an international community by proposing the use of reason as the only criterion for membership in that community, it remained to formulate the laws needed to impose order on it. But before accomplishing that task, two questions must be accounted for: what is the nature of the ius gentium, and what is its relation to ius naturale? How theologians, philosophers, jurists sought the answers between 1500 and 1700 is the subject of this essay.
Receptions of the Ancient Middle East, ca. 1600–1800
The Allure of the Ancient investigates how the ancient Middle East was imagined and appropriated for artistic, scholarly, and political purposes in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Bringing together scholars of the ancient and early modern worlds, the volume approaches reception history from an interdisciplinary perspective, asking how early modern artists and scholars interpreted ancient Middle Eastern civilizations—such as Egypt, Babylonia, and Persia—and how their interpretations were shaped by early modern contexts and concerns.
The volume’s chapters cross disciplinary boundaries in their explorations of art, philosophy, science, and literature, as well as geographical boundaries, spanning from Europe to the Caribbean to Latin America.
Contributors include Elisa Boeri, Mark Darlow, Nirit Ben-Aryeh Debby, Florian Ebeling, Margaret Geoga, Diane Greco Josefowicz, Andrea L. Middleton, Julia Prest, Felipe Rojas Silva, Maryam Sanjabi, Michael Seymour, John Steele, and Daniel Stolzenberg.