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Twenty-Five Years of Research on Global Governance
Volume Editors: Kurt Mills and Kendall Stiles
The journal Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism was founded in 1995 and has since offered policy-relevant and theoretically advanced articles aimed at both academic and practitioner audiences. This collection presents some of the most significant pieces published in the journal, addressing topics ranging from human rights and peacekeeping to trade and development – often examining the evolution of the institutional arrangements themselves. Authors include senior UN officials, prominent scholars, and other careful students of international organization. By presenting these twenty-five articles – one from each year since the journal’s founding – in one volume (with an Introduction by by the two editors Kurt Mills and Kendall Stiles) we hope that the reader will be able to better appreciate the evolution of both global institutions and our thinking about them.

Contributors include: Kurt Mills, Kendall Stiles, James N. Rosenau, Inis L. Claude, Jr., David Held, Kofi Annan, Ngaire Woods, Craig Warkentin, Karen Mingst, John Gerard Ruggie, Peter M. Haas, Mats Berdal, Jessica Tuchman Mathews, Rosemary Foot, Michele M. Betsill, Harriet Bulkeley, Michael Barnett, Hunjoon Kim, Madalene O’Donnell, Laura Sitea, Claudia Pahl-Wostl, Joyeeta Gupta, Daniel Petry, Roger A. Coate, Andrea Birdsall, Gilles Carbonnier, Fritz Brugger, Jana Krause, Paul D. Williams, Alex J. Bellamy, John Karlsrud, Kathryn Sikkink, Mateja Peter, Gregory T. Chin, Matthew D. Stephen, Kjølv Egeland, Caroline Fehl, and Johannes Thimm.
In: Understanding Global Cooperation
Author: Mateja Peter

Abstract

Mandates of recent peacekeeping operations across Africa have shown substantial innovation in the thinking of the UN Security Council. Offensive use of force, use of unmanned aerial vehicles, strategic intelligence and communication, and state-building mandates in the midst of conflicts have all expanded the scope of activities beyond what the UN peacekeepers are accustomed to. The UN is entering a new era of enforcement peacekeeping. Enforcement peacekeeping manifests itself both in enforcement of political solutions through support of a government’s statebuilding ambitions and its attempts to extend state authority in the midst of conflict and in enforcement of military victories through the offensive use of force. These developments further unsettle the basic principles of UN peacekeeping—consent, impartiality, and nonuse of force—resulting in a schism between the doctrine and practice. This contribution argues that such fundamental challenges, when not properly acknowledged, create a wall between operational activities and strategic considerations. They preclude a proper debate on the problematic externalities, in particular on political processes and peacebuilding.

In: Understanding Global Cooperation

Abstract

We explore how the Cities for Climate Protection (CCP) program, a network that is simultaneously global and local, state and nonstate, could be conceptualized as part of global environmental governance. We suggest that traditional approaches to international relations—regime theory and transnational networks—offer limited conceptual space for analyzing such networks. These approaches obscure how the governance of global climate change takes place through processes and institutions operating at and between a variety of scales and involving a range of actors with different levels and forms of authority. We contend that it is only by taking a multilevel perspective that we can fully capture the social, political, and economic processes that shape global environmental governance.

In: Understanding Global Cooperation
In: Understanding Global Cooperation

Abstract

Since entering office, US president Trump has reversed key multilateral achievements of his predecessors, initiating a new US retreat from multilateral cooperation. For other governments wishing to preserve and deepen existing global agreements, this has posed the question of whether and how multilateral cooperation can work without the leadership and support of the dominant global power. International relations scholars have already debated the possibility of “nonhegemonic cooperation” in earlier periods marked by US unilateralism. This article draws on these previous analyses to evaluate the current prospects and limits of a “multilateralism minus one” in three key global policy areas: nuclear arms control, climate change, and trade.

In: Understanding Global Cooperation

Abstract

In the 1990s, liberal optimism permeated the study and practice of international politics. International institutions were strengthened and the discourse and practice of global governance consolidated as a new approach to world affairs. Today, new powers are emerging in this institutionalized order. New powers have changed the power relations that underpinned global governance and are also economically, politically, and culturally different from established powers. Against this backdrop, this article investigates the impacts emerging powers are having on global governance. It presents six major trends and outlines their implications for the new global governance currently taking shape. Because new powers are emerging in an already institutionalized order, the emerging global governance order is gradually growing out of the existing one. Emerging powers are rendering parts of global governance dysfunctional, layering onto it, complicating it, but not overthrowing it.

In: Understanding Global Cooperation

Abstract

This article examines the most significant international policy responses that seek to address the resource trap and spur development in resourcerich, but fragile states. It applies a regime theoretical framework to assess recent multistakeholder initiatives within the extractive sector by focusing on the processes through which they seek to alter the behavior of public and private organizations. Based on a review of the Nigerian and Azeri cases, the article finds that civil society often does not have the capacity to live up to the high expectations placed on it by these initiatives. The effectiveness and eventual success of multistakeholder initiatives in the extractive sector require exploring alternative pathways to affect behavior of key actors. Stronger market incentives and regulation can provide the conditions required for extractive activities to result in positive development outcomes.

In: Understanding Global Cooperation
In: Understanding Global Cooperation