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Translator:
Japanese youth, like everywhere else, are trying to build their future despite the crises that are shaking their world, the latest being the triple disaster of Fukushima. Often considered to be more focused on a personal or even hedonistic life, they surprised the media when a student movement took the floor to criticize the Abe government's security and Self-Defense Forces bills in 2015. The so-called SEALDs movement (Student Emergency Action for Liberal Democracy) was formed some time after the Indigenous or Occupy Wall Street movements, but it shares similar concerns.
Understanding the SEALDs' experience from the perspective of John Dewey's philosophy allows us to highlight once again the dangers that digital technology poses to individuals, the collective and their values.

Abstract

Japan’s youth, considered depoliticized, surprised the national media when a movement of students mainly attached to Tokyo universities, called Students Emergency Action for Liberal Democracy (SEALDs), formed in 2015 to criticize the Abe government’s security and Self-Defence Forces bills. Out of sync with the Indignados or Occupy Wall Street movements, SEALDs was not scrutinized like the other movements, even though it had similar concerns. With reference to the philosophy of John Dewey, this “forgotten” movement is analyzed as an experiment in learning about democracy by young Japanese people confronted with crises that cast a shadow over their future. The mobilization made possible by digital technology is also critically examined.

In: Occupy Tokyo: SEALDs, the Forgotten Movement
Papal Pardons and Everyday Life in East Central Europe (1450-1550)
Negotiating Violence examines the ways in which ordinary people used a transnational papal court of law for disputing their private local hostilities and for negotiating their social status and identities. Following the career and routine crossovers of runaway friars, the book offers vivid insights into the late medieval culture of violence, honour, emotions, learning and lay-clerical interactions. The story plays itself out in the large composite state of the Kingdom of Hungary and Croatia, which collapses under the Ottomans’ sword in front of the readers’ eyes. The bottom-up approach of the Christian-Muslim military conflict renders visible the rationalities of those commoners who voluntarily crossed the religious boundary, while the multi-tiered story convincingly drives home the argument that the motor of social and religious change was lay society rather than the clergy in this turbulent age.
In: Negotiating Violence
In: Negotiating Violence
In: Negotiating Violence
In: Negotiating Violence
In: Negotiating Violence
In: Negotiating Violence
In: Negotiating Violence