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Volume Editors: David Thomas and John A. Chesworth
Christian-Muslim Relations, a Bibliographical History19 (CMR 19), covering Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean in the period 1800-1914, is a further volume in a general history of relations between the two faiths from the 7th century to the early 20th century. It comprises a series of introductory essays and the main body of detailed entries. These treat all the works, surviving or lost, that have been recorded. They provide biographical details of the authors, descriptions and assessments of the works themselves, and complete accounts of manuscripts, editions, translations and studies. The result of collaboration between numerous new and leading scholars, CMR 19, along with the other volumes in this series, is intended as a basic tool for research in Christian-Muslim relations.

Section Editors: Ines Aščerić-Todd, Clinton Bennett, Luis F. Bernabé Pons, Jaco Beyers, Emanuele Colombo, Lejla Demiri, Martha Frederiks, David D. Grafton, Stanisław Grodź, Alan Guenther, Vincenzo Lavenia, Arely Medina, Diego Melo Carrasco, Alain Messaoudi, Gordon Nickel, Claire Norton, Reza Pourjavady, Douglas Pratt, Charles Ramsey, Peter Riddell, Umar Ryad, Cornelia Soldat, Charles Tieszen, Carsten Walbiner, Catherina Wenzel
Strategies of Belonging in Indian Ocean Island Societies
Volume Editors: Iain Walker and Marie-Aude Fouéré
All the islands of the western Indian Ocean are immigrant societies: Austronesian seafarers, African slaves, Arab traders, South Asian indentured labourers and European plantation owners have all settled, more or less voluntarily, on Madagascar and Zanzibar, in the Mascarenes and the Comoros. Successive arrivals often struggle to establish their places in these societies, negotiating their way in the face of antipathy, resistance, even violence, as different claims to belonging conflict. The contributions to this volume take a selection of case studies from across the region, and from different perspectives, contributing to a theorisation of the concept of belonging itself.

Contributors are Patrick Desplat, Franziska Fay, Marie-Aude Fouéré, Akbar Keshodkar, Hans Olsson, Gitanjali Pyndiah, Ramola Ramtohul, Iain Walker
Celebración, resistencia furtiva y transformación cultural
En Cofradías Afrohispánicas: celebración, resistencia furtiva y transformación cultural, Manuel Apodaca Valdez ofrece un estudio de 42 cofradías de afrodescendientes del periodo colonial y seis cofradías contemporáneas aún vivas en cuatro zonas geográficas: España, Perú, México y República Dominicana.

Esta investigación histórica y comparativa de corte trasatlántico analiza datos recogidos en archivos históricos e investigación de campo. El estudio muestra evidencias de las condiciones sociales, políticas, culturales y espirituales de las personas de origen africano que se integraron en cofradías durante el periodo colonial. Su legado trazó un camino caracterizado por la hibridación y la transformación, cimentando las bases para las cofradías afrohispánicas del presente, un fenómeno que el autor interpreta como resistencia furtiva y celebración de la identidad cultural.

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In Cofradías Afrohispánicas [ Afro-Hispanic Confraternities], Manuel Apodaca Valdez offers an account of forty-two confraternities of African descendants of the colonial period, along with six contemporary confraternities still alive in four geographical regions: Spain, Perú, México, and the Dominican Republic.

This historical and comparative trans-Atlantic study analyzes data gathered from archives and field work research. The work shows evidence of the social, political, cultural, and spiritual conditions of the peoples of African descent integrated in confraternities during the colonial time. Their legacy traced a path historically marked by hybridism and transformation laying the foundation for contemporary Afro-confraternities, a phenomenon interpreted by the author as furtive resistance and celebration of cultural identity.
Author: Nathan P. Devir
Millions of African Christians who consider themselves genealogical descendants of one of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel—in other words, Jewish by ethnicity, but Christian in terms of faith—are increasingly choosing a religious affiliation that honors both of these identities. Their choice: Messianic Judaism. Messianic adherents emulate the Christians of the first century, observing the Jewish commandments while also affirming the salvational grace of Yeshua (Jesus). As the first comparative ethnography of such “fulfilled Jews” on the African continent, this book presents case studies that will enrich our understanding of one of global Christianity’s most overlooked iterations.
A Historical Narrative from Ignatius of Loyola to Pedro Arrupe
Author: Festo Mkenda SJ
Jesuits have been in Africa since they were founded, yet their history there remains poorly documented. Although scholars have started to focus on specific regions like Congo, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe, a comprehensive picture of the entire Jesuit experience on the continent is still lacking. In a condensed yet accessible way, Jesuits in Africa fills that lacuna. Narrating the story century by century from the time of St. Ignatius of Loyola (c.1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, to that of Pedro Arrupe (1907-91, in office 1965-83), 28th general superior of the Society, the book makes Jesuit history in Africa available to a general readership while offering scholars a broad view in which specialized topics can be conceived and deepened.
Author: Graham Kings
The theological treasures gathered here show the intriguing coherence of an unfolding vision. Earthed in the ministry of a priest, missionary, academic theologian, and well-travelled bishop, the five settings provide 16 chapters written over 34 years in Kenya, Cambridge, Islington, Sherborne and Lambeth. Art, poetry and archives mingle with theology, history and spirituality. Memorable scenes include a Kenyan liturgy on the environment and Bishop Gitari’s preaching, the drama of worship on the streets of London, a Deuteronomic prequel to the Prodigal Son, flashes from the lives of Henry Martyn and Stephen Harding, the birth of South Sudan and the historic dialogue of John Stott and Basil Meeking.
Author: Graham Kings

Abstract

This chapter considers the following themes in the Bible and in African Traditional Religions: first, continuity (should the kikuyu name for God be written ngai or Ngai?); second, accommodation (what does it mean for the ‘treasures and wealth of the nations’ to be brought into the kingdom of God?); confrontation (is there such a thing as ‘theological fornication’?); and salvation (outside the church is there any salvation?). These themes are illustrated by contemporary stories of mission in Kenya.

In: Nourishing Mission
Author: Graham Kings

Abstract

In March 2003, I chaired a conference at St Mary’s Islington, on ‘Our Mission in Britain Today’. The three addresses were from conservative, open and charismatic perspectives, of evangelical Anglicanism. I arranged for their publication in a journal and wrote this chapter to set the scene for them, and for the fourth National Evangelical Anglican Congress in September 2003 at Blackpool. I provided first the current outlines of the three traditions, and then reflections on their history and theology before concluding about the need for rigour without rancour.

In: Nourishing Mission
Author: Graham Kings

Abstract

In my conclusion, I consider Genesis and the Ascension in tracing the concept of God who creates and then ‘gets out of the way’, providing space for human beings, while also reshaping God’s supportive presence. Mission involves following this pattern of God, who creates, gets out of the way, and assures. I point out that in the previous chapters mission and church, theology and practice, worship and ministry have all interwoven over the years, and give three answers to the question ‘why write?’. I end with my poem, The Prayer Stool, which involves delving deeply into God and being sent out by God into his world.

In: Nourishing Mission
Author: Graham Kings

Abstract

This chapter developed out of a lecture given at the Catholic Theological Union, Chicago, in 2010. It gives the context for my mission as a bishop in Dorset as well as reflecting on the themes of Word, Tradition, Sacrament and Unity and on the bishops (David Gitari, John V. Taylor, David Stancliffe and Tom Wright) and theologians (Oliver O’Donovan, Kwame Bediako, David Ford and Michael Nai-Chiu Poon) who have influenced me.

In: Nourishing Mission