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The Second and Third Generation have become increasingly active in remembering and researching their families’ pasts, especially now that most refugees from National Socialism have passed away. How was lived experience mediated to them, and how have their own lives and identities been impacted by persecution and flight?
This volume offers a valuable insight into the personal experience of the Second Generation, as well as a perceptive analysis of film, art, and literature created by or about the subsequent generations. Recurring themes of silences, transferred trauma, postmemory, and “roots journeys" are explored, revealing the distance, connection, and collaboration between the generations.

Contributors are: David Clark, Miriam E. David, Rachel Dickson, Yannick Gnipep-oo Pembouong, Anita H. Grosz, Andrea Hammel, Brean Hammond, Stephanie Homer, Merilyn Moos, Angharad Mountford, Teresa von Sommaruga Howard, Jennifer Taylor, and Sue Vice.
From Acceptable Undesirables to Respected Businessmen
Author:
This is the first book in English to discuss the changing attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jewish immigrants and the State of Israel from the 1930s onwards. Jewish Chileans have ascended rapidly from the status of undesirable immigrants to middle and upper-middle class, facing less obstacles than their Argentine coreligionists. Particular emphasis is given to the failed struggle to extradite war criminal Walther Rauff and to the years of the military dictatorship headed by General Augusto Pinochet. By the 1970s, Israel seemed a strong pro-Western barrier to the expansion of communism and Islamic fundamentalism.
In: Attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jews
In: Attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jews
In: Attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jews
In: Attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jews
In: Attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jews
In: Attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jews
In: Attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jews
Author:
This book deals with how, starting in the 1960s, immigrant groups in Israel constructed their ethnic identity by reviving their ethnic festivals and turning them into part of Israeli society. For the immigrants, these festivals serve as a collective “definitional ceremony,” with an intersection of ethnicity, culture, and identity. They also help them to develop cultural and religious syncretism. The discussion of their social and political leaders’ ethnic activism provides important insights about the ways in which immigrant leaders employ their ethnic tradition as a resource for mobilizing cultural, social, and political capital that will facilitate their penetration of the cultural mainstream.