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In the treatise On the Change of Names (part of his magnum opus, the Allegorical Commentary), Philo of Alexandria brings his figurative exegesis of the Abraham cycle to its fruition. Taking a cue from Platonist interpreters of Homer’s Odyssey, Philo reads Moses’s story of Abraham as an account of the soul’s progress and perfection. Responding to contemporary critics, who mocked Genesis 17 as uninspired, Philo finds instead a hidden philosophical reflection on the ineffability of the transcendent God, the transformation of souls which recognize their mortal nothingness, the possibility of human faith enabled by peerless faithfulness of God, and the fruit of moral perfection: joy divine, prefigured in the birth of Isaac.
This book represents the first monograph (miscellany) entirely devoted to Crantor of Soli (app. 335–275 BCE), an outstanding figure of the Old Academy. He was in particular famous for his On Grief, an exemplary work of consolation literature, and for his being the first commentator of Plato’s Timaeus. Unlike his darling Arcesilaus of Pitane, who initiated the Sceptical turn, Crantor seems to have stuck firm to the Academic teachings of Polemon and Plato. The contributions collected in this book aim to convey a complete picture of Crantor by discussing various aspects of his philosophy and biography.
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A wealth of political literature has survived, from political theory by Plato and Aristotle to the variety of prose and verse literature that more broadly demonstrate political thinking. However, despite the extent of this legacy, it can be surprisingly hard to say how ancient Greek political thought has made its influence present, or whether this influence has been sustained across the centuries. This volume includes a range of disciplinary responses to issues surrounding the legacy of Greek political thought, demonstrating the ways in which political thinking has evolved from antiquity to the present day.
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In the Gorgias Plato offers a synthesis of what he thinks about the bitter conflict between philosophical and non-philosophical approaches to one’s responsibilities in private and public life. This book contributes to a deeper understanding of this historically and conceptually rich canvas by shedding light on its main topics: speech in its philosophical and non-philosophical forms, psychology in relation to virtuous life, and politics which charges the two former topics with high stakes that call for personal choices.
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The book is a critical edition of the text with an English translation and commentary of Proclus’ On the Hieratic Art according to the Greeks. The Hieratic Art is the Theurgic Art, theurgy, the theurgic union with the divine. Proclus describes the theurgic union, putting an emphasis on a conceptual blending of ritual actions (teletai, e.g. the role of statues, incenses, synthêmata, symbols, purifications, invocations and epiphanies) and philosophical concepts (e.g. union of many powers, ‘one and many’, symphathy, natural sympathies, attraction, mixing and division).
In: Proclus' On the Hieratic Art according to the Greeks
In: Proclus' On the Hieratic Art according to the Greeks
In: Proclus' On the Hieratic Art according to the Greeks
In: Proclus' On the Hieratic Art according to the Greeks

Abstract

In the last part of the Gorgias, to build the debate between Socrates and Callicles, Plato reemploys thematic and structural elements of the agon of Euripides’ Antiope between the two brothers Zéthos and Amphion, sons of Antiope and builders of the Theban walls. The importance of the reprise, made explicit by Plato, leads one to wonder about its meaning in the dialogue, since the latter contains a severe rebuttal of tragedy, which it criticises as a form of rhetoric. To answer this question, we will study how the agon of the Antiope is integrated into the plot of the Gorgias to highlight, in a kind of dramatic crescendo, the limits of the elenchos and the stakes of the choice of philosophical life, which implies a new heroism, different from the tragic one. Indeed, in the Gorgias, a new drama is played out, with a new hero, on a new stage, that of the Socratic dialogue.

Open Access
In: Plato’s Gorgias: Speech, Soul and Politics