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This book examines the interrelationships between trauma, time, and narrative in the novel “The Journey” (1962) by the scholar, novelist, poet, and Holocaust survivor H. G. Adler. Drawing on Paul Ricœur’s philosophy of time and studies of time in literature, Julia Menzel analyzes how Adler’s novel depicts the experience of time as a dimension of Holocaust victims’ trauma. She explores the aesthetic temporality of “The Journey” and presents a new interpretation of the literary text, which she conceives of as a modern “Zeit-Roman” (time novel).

Die Studie untersucht die Wechselbeziehungen zwischen Trauma, Zeit und Erzählung in dem Roman „Eine Reise“ (1962) des Wissenschaftlers, Schriftstellers, Dichters und Holocaust-Überlebenden H. G. Adler. Unter Bezugnahme auf Paul Ricœurs Zeitphilosophie und die literaturwissenschaftliche Zeitforschung analysiert Julia Menzel, wie Adlers Roman traumatische Zeiterfahrungen der Opfer des Holocaust zur Darstellung bringt. Sie erkundet die ästhetische Eigenzeit von „Eine Reise“ und eröffnet eine neue Lesart des literarischen Texts, den sie als modernen Zeit-Roman begreift.
Hebrew Verb Form Semantics in Zechariah
This is the first major study of the Biblical Hebrew verbal system of a prophetic book. It is also the first book-length study in over 60 years to focus on how genre affects the Hebrew verbal system. It advances a data-driven argument that Biblical Hebrew verb forms do not function one way in prose and another way in poetry. Lastly, the author addresses the diachronic development of Hebrew between the destruction of the First Temple and the writing of the Dead Sea Scrolls.
Jews Passing as Gentiles in Post-WWII and Multicultural American Fiction
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Racial passing has fascinated thousands of American readers since the end of the nineteenth century. However, the phenomenon of Jews passing as gentiles has been all but overlooked. This book examines forgotten novels depicting Jewish Americans masquerading as gentiles. Exploring two "waves" of publications of this subgenre—in the 1940s-1950s and 1990s-2000s—this book asks questions about the perceptions of Jewish difference during these periods.Looking at issues such as Whiteness, Americannes, gender, and race, it traces the changes in the representation of Jewish identity during the second half of the twentieth century and the beginning of the new millennium.
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The Second and Third Generation have become increasingly active in remembering and researching their families’ pasts, especially now that most refugees from National Socialism have passed away. How was lived experience mediated to them, and how have their own lives and identities been impacted by persecution and flight?
This volume offers a valuable insight into the personal experience of the Second Generation, as well as a perceptive analysis of film, art, and literature created by or about the subsequent generations. Recurring themes of silences, transferred trauma, postmemory, and “roots journeys" are explored, revealing the distance, connection, and collaboration between the generations.

Contributors are: David Clark, Miriam E. David, Rachel Dickson, Yannick Gnipep-oo Pembouong, Anita H. Grosz, Andrea Hammel, Brean Hammond, Stephanie Homer, Merilyn Moos, Angharad Mountford, Teresa von Sommaruga Howard, Jennifer Taylor, and Sue Vice.
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This monograph spotlights women writers’ contributions to the philosophy of German Romanticism. Dorothea Mendelssohn Veit Schlegel, Rahel Levin Varnhagen, Karoline von Günderrode, and Bettina Brentano von Arnim suggested a new vision for an emancipated community of women that develops through philosophical discourse of Progressive Universal Poetry. Their personal, fictionalized, and literary letters reinvent and retheorize the Romantic notions of sociability, symphilosophy, and sympoetry, as theorized by men, and retheorize the concepts of love. They provided a model for shaping intellectual and cultural life in the modern world while challenging rigid dichotomies of classs, gender, and ethnicity.
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This book is the first to deal with documentary aesthetic practices of the post-war period in Eastern Europe in a comparative perspective. The contributions examine the specific forms and modes of documentary representations and the role they played in the formation of new aesthetic trends during the cultural-political transition of the long 1960s. This documentary first-hand approach to the world aimed to break up unquestioned ideological structures and expose tabooed truths in order to engender much-needed social changes. New ways of depicting daily life, writing testimony or subjective reportage emerged that still shape cultural debates today.

Abstract

In the 1960s, the Lithuanian American filmmaker, poet, and critic Jonas Mekas (1922–2019) was one of the pivotal representatives of the New American Cinema movement and published his signature “diary films,” including Diaries, Notes, and Sketches (also known as Walden) (1969), Reminiscences from a Journey to Lithuania (1972), or Lost, Lost, Lost (1976). These works are known for their fleeting record and ‘celebration’ of everyday life between the city and idyllic nature, work and leisure. Mekas’ documentary aesthetic follows two divergent principles: On the one hand, it bears a clear neo-avant-garde mark by virtue of the “shaky camera” (Mekas), constructive editing, and a noisy soundtrack. On the other hand, this materiality and physicality is filtered through a temporal distance, a ‘gap’ between the captured moment and the rearrangement of its footage. The films represent a search for the past—Mekas’s Lithuanian childhood, his years in German Labor and DP camps, and his first years in Brooklyn—through poetic voiceover comments and inserted citations. Avant-garde estrangement devices are thus contrasted by a poetics of memory and lament. Paradoxically, this discrepancy between formalism and nostalgia constitutes Mekas’ original abstract documentary mode.

In: Documentary Aesthetics in the Long 1960s in Eastern Europe and Beyond
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Abstract

The essay analyses the artwork Shapolsky et al. Manhattan Real Estate Holdings, A Real Time Social System, as of May 1, 1971 by Hans Haacke to examine how artists attempted to depict social realities in the 1960s using the specific representational modes of the time. It discusses the interrelations between these representational modes—in which documents received a new role as an artistic means—and the social and political developments during the Cold War, which promoted specific ways of looking at and explaining realities (drawing on information technology and systems theory, among others). Thus, the newly developed representational strategies bore more resemblance to factography as developed in the Soviet Union in the 1920s than to the tradition of liberal social documentary in the US.

In: Documentary Aesthetics in the Long 1960s in Eastern Europe and Beyond

Abstract

Varlam Shalamov’s Kolyma Tales are an integral part of international debates on literary testimony and documentary writing after Kolyma and Auschwitz. The essay focusses on the relationships between Shalamov’s prose and his theoretical reflections about writing after Kolyma and the literary situation during the years of the Thaw period. This contextualisation allows for an analysis of Varlam Shalamov’s concept of “new prose” as a critical intervention into the debates on documentary writing within the Russian Soviet literary scene of the 1950s and 1960s.