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The Canadian Pentecostal Experience includes eighteen essays organized into three themes: 1) Historiography and Early Canadian Pentecostalism; 2) Theological Practices and Processes; and 3) Social and Cultural Change. This collection makes a significant contribution to the growing literature of global Pentecostal scholarship. The works are important for the Canadian context but as the editors argue in the Introduction, Canadian Pentecostalism is “glocal” (shaped by both local and global realities). This collection will interest readers drawn from the wider field of religious studies and global Pentecostalism to initiate conversations about how Pentecostalism evolves in both its local and global expressions.
Religious Stories Korean American Dreamers Tell in the Face of Uncertainty
Author:
In Undocumented Migration as a Theologizing Experience, Eunil David Cho examines how Korean American undocumented young adults tell religious stories to cope with the violence of uncertainty and construct new meanings for themselves. Based on in-depth interviews guided by narrative inquiry, the book follows the stories of ten Korean American DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipients who have found their lives in limbo. While many experience narrative foreclosure, believing “My story is over,” Cho highlights how telling religious stories enables them to imagine and create new stories for themselves not as shunned outsiders, but as beloved children of God.
Irish Quaker biographers have focused on ministers, the influential and wealthy; many biographies are also unstructured and selective, leaving gaps in the narrative. The current work uses the life and family of John Boles (1661-1731), a Quaker stalwart for 50 years, as a case study for the biographer, introducing the major sources and showing how they can be deployed to 'resurrect' the contributions of the anonymous Quaker majority. As the biography is developed, information is explored and analyzed to construct reliable genealogical charts; information is culled from Friends' records to document the contributions and failures of family members in the context of their Quaker meetings; land records are consulted to measure and assess their gradual accumulation of wealth and the historical context is discussed as a backdrop to their evolving socio-economic status - all topics essential for comprehensive Quaker biographies and family histories.

Abstract

Irish Quaker biographers have focused on ministers, the influential and wealthy; many biographies are also unstructured and selective, leaving gaps in the narrative. The current work uses the life and family of John Boles (1661–1731), a Quaker stalwart for fifty years, as a case study for the biographer, introducing the major sources and showing how they can be deployed to ‘resurrect’ the contributions of the anonymous Quaker majority. As the biography is developed, information is explored and analyzed to construct reliable genealogical charts; information is culled from Friends’ records to document the contributions and failures of family members in the context of their Quaker meetings; land records are consulted to measure and assess their gradual accumulation of wealth, and the historical context is discussed as a backdrop to their evolving socio-economic status—all topics essential for comprehensive Quaker biographies and family histories.

In: Resurrecting Family Histories and Biographies for Members of the Society of Friends in Ireland
V. F. Minorsky and C. J. Edmonds Correspondence (1928-1965)
This volume is an annotated correspondence, of nearly forty years, between two prominent Orientalists. The letters cover a range of topics related to the Zagros Mountains, its peoples, their history, culture, and languages. They also offer a glimpse into the personal lives and careers of the two scholars, give valuable insights on the development of the field of Kurdish Studies, and to an extent outline the contours of what the two referred to as Zagrology.

Abstract

The beginning of the twentieth century was marked by colossal changes in various spheres of life, including art, where appeared numerous choreographies produced by both professional dancers and esoteric teachers. This article analyzes the choreography of George Gurdjieff, a dance practice simply called “Movements.” This practice was often considered as closely related to and being a product of the artistic environment of the time. The article argues that even though being the product of the time, Gurdjieff’s dance requires a close attention. It will show that his approach to dance downplays aesthetic and emotional aspects. Applying the hybrid methodology, this article will first identify the place of the Movements in Gurdjieff’s teaching. It will then illustrate how the Movements differ from modern German dance. Finally, it will analyze and describe the author’s ethnographic experiences in the study and practice of the Movements.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
In: Contributions to Zagrology