Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 44,982 items for :

  • Brill | Sense x
  • Primary Language: English x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:
Exploring the nexus of music and religious education concerns fundamental questions regarding music itself, including what music is, how to interpret music, and why music is important, in relation to both education and religious practice into which it is integrated.
This cross-disciplinary volume of essays offers the first comprehensive set of studies to examine the role of music in educational and religious reform and the underlying notions of music in early modern Europe. It elucidates the context and manner in which music served as a means of religious teaching and learning during that time, thereby identifying the religio-cultural and intellectual foundations of early modern European musical phenomena and their significance for exploring the interplay of music and religious education today.
The discourse of decolonisation, though littered with unresolved contestation in the university as an institution of higher learning, has often been blamed on the impact of neoliberal globalisation philosophy. The book volume focuses on unfinished project of decolonisation, with an aim on African knowledge and the historical question of canonicity by keeping the emancipative dialogue alive. The authors place great scrutiny on the quality of curriculum offered in universities arguing that a sound relevant curriculum, original to the continent, can save Africa’s citizenry from challenges bedevilling socio-economic development.

Through a decolonial approach to the curriculum universities in Africa, the book proposes, can contribute to the disruption and potential end to Western hegemonic epistemologies that continue to manifest in the neoliberal geopolitical terrain exhibited in the form of cultural imperialism, epistemicide, and linguicide. The volume interrogates and challenges the neocolonial entanglement in regional higher education policy processes coupled with the excessive dependence of regional stakeholders on western external actors for higher education policy and envisages a decolonial alternative future for the regionalisation of higher education in Africa. To that end, the book makes brings in a more philosophical and practical hermeneutic of knowledge production and dissemination that unyokes post-independence African universities from the bondage of erstwhile colonisers.
Author:
Andy Blunden completes his immanent critique of Activity Theory, begun in 2010 with An Interdisciplinary Theory of Activity. A summary of the ontological foundations of Activity Theory introduces a critical review of the work of activity theorists across the world with a focus of applications in medical and educational contexts, and concluded with a review of the ethics of collaboration. Blunden expands the domain of Activity Theory to address the pressing problems facing humanity today and activities lacking in clear objects, collaboration in voluntary projects and social movements, the life projects of individuals and emerging practices. Blunden brings an understanding of Marxist and Hegelian philosophy to bear on the application of Activity Theory to problems of social change.
The book explores the role of higher education in increasing social mobility and reducing social inequality in today’s world. The first part examines the cultural openness of the knowledge society and its contribution to reducing social inequalities. The second part examines inclusive higher education in support of social mobility. The third part reveals digital technologies in higher education and their significance for the growth of social mobility. The fourth part discusses the best international practices and offers recommendations for educational management in support of reducing social inequalities.
Author:
This book presents an empirically based examination of language patterns found among the Israeli Druze community, which is profiled against that of the Arabs in Israel. The results document the emergence of a mixed language previously undescribed and provides a socio-political analysis.
This study intends thus to make a contribution to the debate on "mixed languages", introducing a model that facilitates the analysis of the link bewteen codeswitching and sociopolitical identity. Special attention is paid to the assessment of language and identity issues of Golan Heights Druze and Israeli Druze, taking into exam two major political debates within these communities, regarding the Israeli Nation-state Law and the so-called ‘Syrian–Israeli secret Golan deal’ speculation.
South Africa's democratic government inherited a divided and unequal system of education. Under apartheid, South Africa had nineteen different educational departments separated by race, language, geography and ideology. This education system prepared learners in different ways for the positions they were expected to occupy in social, economic and political life under apartheid and was funded and resourced in ways that favoured white people and disadvantaged black people who remain in the working class. The newly elected democratic government in 1994 laid a foundation for a single national education system. Twenty-five years after the dawn of democracy, education is still in a parlous state in many communities in South Africa, but it is in the rural areas mainly in the former homelands - that learners are most disadvantaged.

Contributors are: Olufemi Timothy Adigun, Oluwatoyin Ayodele Ajani, Alan Bhekisisa Buthelezi, Joyce Phikisile Dhlamini, Bongani Thulani Gamede, Samantha Govender, Lawrence Kehinde, Nontobeko Prudence Khumalo, Primrose Ntombenhle Khumalo, Azwidohwi Philip Kutame, Manthekeleng Linake, Sive Makeleni, Nkhensani Maluleke, Bothwell Manyonga, Mncedisi Christian Maphalala, Takalani Mashau, Hlengiwe Romualda Mhlongo, Rachel Gugu Mkhasibe, Dumisani Wilfred Mncube, Nicholus Tumelo Mollo, Ramashego Shila Mphahlele, Fikile Mthethwa, Grace Matodzi Muremela, Edmore Mutekwe, Nokuthula Hierson Ndaba, Clever Ndebele, Thandiwe Nonkululeko Ngema, Phiwokuhle Bongiwe Ngubane, Sindile Ngubane, Dumisani Nzima, Livhuwani Peter Ramabulana, and Maria Tsakeni.
Illuminating Diversity in Rural Communities in the United States
Illuminating issues of diversity at the intersection of rural education and multilingual learners (ML) in the United States, this edited volume brings forth new research that captures the importance of place and rurality in the work of educators who serve multilingual learners and their families. The six chapters in this book demonstrate that education for teachers, leaders and staff, professional development programs, and government-funded projects aimed to improve rural education need to begin with three interrelated, multifaceted principles. The first principle is the need to center place and rurality as essential for all the educators, students, and families within a particular instructional context. Second, educators must humanize multilingual students, their families, and their cultures in ways that go beyond merely acknowledging their presence but that goes further – to deeply seeing and understanding the lives and (hi)stories of students and families in schools and communities. Finally, the third principle involves identifying multilingual resources for ML students and their families. Given the persistent inequities in access to resources and opportunities that rural ML students and families face, this last principle requires careful planning, networking, and advocating in ways that can truly effectuate change.

Contributors are: Jioanna Carjuzaa, Maria R. Coady, Paula Golombek, Shuzhan Li, Kristin Kline Liu, Nidza V. Marichal, Charity Funfe Tatah Mentan, Kym O’Donnell, Stephanie Oudghiri, Darrell Peterson, Sonja Phillips, Jenelle Reeves and Yi-Chen Wu.