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In: Processes of Cultural Change and Integration in the Roman World
In: Processes of Cultural Change and Integration in the Roman World
In: Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology
In: Local Economies?

Abstract

Using ceramic evidence, this paper examines the differences between the supply of coastal and inland regions of Africa from the 4th to 7th c. A.D. While a narrow band of coastline across the Mediterranean seems to be fully integrated into a common system of consumption (e.g. importing overseas amphora and the principal African Red Slip (ARS) forms), most of the inland regions seem to be more impervious to non-regional products (e.g. no transport amphorae and mainly local ARS); this is a situation which is particularly obvious in the Algerian high plains. Nevertheless, an accurate analysis of the documentation allows us to discern some indications of inter-provincial contacts via ancient east-west terrestrial routes.

In: Local Economies?

Abstract

This article investigates the history of the agorai and minor plazas, excavated at Sagalassos in SW Turkey, during late antiquity (A.D. 283 to ca. 650). It presents new field observations made by the author, based on a survey of stone surface markings, epigraphic context, and spoliation history, and offers an interpretive study of these spaces in terms of their function during the 4th–7th centuries A.D. An assessment of the significance of these observations for the nature of urban government in this period is also offered.

In: Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology

Abstract

This paper surveys reused and recycled material culture from the Roman period, particularly that found in late antique contexts. While there is a focus on Late/Post Roman material from Britain, examples from wider Late Antiquity are also included. Reuse and recycling is clearly part of normal Roman practice, however particular instances must be evaluated within their specific contexts and the varied motives that exist for reuse behaviour need to be considered. Reuse seems to increase significantly in the late 4th c. onwards in Britain, and this well-documented evidence can most readily be explained firstly in relation to the wider problems with production and distribution systems that led to a collapse in the availability of new durable material culture at the end of the 4th c. and secondly with regard to wider cultural change.

In: Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology

Abstract

A wealth of information concerning the artefact assemblages of Late Antiquity is available to us in the forms of excavated material and contemporary texts and images. Research comprising part of the Visualisation of the Late Antique City project at the University of Kent seeks to identify type assemblages associated with specific activities and types of space within the city. In order to do this it is necessary to apply a range of analytical techniques, some of them familiar statistical approaches and others more specialised, to the available evidence. This paper examines the potential for applying correspondence analysis and network analysis to large datasets comprised of evidence from multiple source types, as well as the obstacles to such application. This will allow us to make reasoned suggestions about the groups of objects likely to appear in settings selected for a visualisation scene. The paper also considers how study of the small-scale spatial distribution of objects can complement research, in the rare cases where exceptional site formation processes preserve assemblages in their primary ancient context.

In: Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology