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In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation
In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation
In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation
In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation
In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation
In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation
In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation
In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation

Abstract

In To Serve God and Wal-Mart historian Bethany Moreton describes the rise of the Wal-Mart model of Christian free enterprise. Most Americans do not see Wal-Mart as Christian or even as religious, but as non-sectarian. Like the United States, Wal-Mart rises above the particularity of religion. It transcends religion. Moreton’s argument resonates powerfully with broader questions in the study of American politics. This chapter explores political theologies of American exceptionalism through the lens of Moreton’s work in conversation with Winnifred Sullivan’s book on prison religion in the United States, Lisa Sideris’s writings on American techno-exceptionalism, and Gil Anidjar’s essay on rethinking what we study when we study Christianity/ies. While each of these authors offers important correctives, most Americans and America-watchers cling to outdated assumptions about the boundaries between the political, the religious and the economic, ignoring their fluid inter-relations and theological aspirations. Exploring these dynamics offers a window onto the ambivalent role of protestant Christianity in American exceptionalism, an ambivalence that affirms and naturalizes what legal theorist Jothie Rajah describes as “an affective conviction in the United States as transcendent.” These convictions, in turn, resonate in and through contemporary American populism.

In: The Spirit of Populism
Author: Vincent Lloyd

Abstract

Media accounts often suggest that anger motivates the rise of populist political movements. Indeed, populism and anger are so closely associated in popular discourse as to become almost one: populism is angry people doing politics. And today, many people are angry. From Trump to Brexit, from rivalries in the Middle East to nationalisms in Eastern Europe to protests in Hong Kong, from racial justice protests in Ferguson to the global #metoo movement, anger now seems to be a prime mover of global politics. In this chapter, Vincent Lloyd classes accounts of anger into two groups. Some cultural critics and philosophers take anger as a fitting response to a wrong. Others take anger, or at least a certain type of anger, as opaque, directed at the injustices baked into a normative order. By turning to accounts of anger from the Hebrew Bible, where human and divine anger are closely tied with authority, Lloyd argues that the opaque concept of anger is often forgotten, or repressed. When it is recovered, we are attuned to questions of domination, and to possibilities for flourishing in a radically different world.

In: The Spirit of Populism