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Series:

Johanna öberg

Abstract

A learning activity inspired by game-informed learning was designed with the aim of promoting participation and critical thinking. The observed learning activity was analysed in order to understand how pupils act within the given and created roles, frames, and positions. The learning activity was based on role-play, in which the pupils assumed the role of co-researchers. The implemented role-playing activity included gamification elements (e.g. rewards, narrative, and feedback). We explored the question: How does game-informed learning promote participation? A total of 15 pupils participated in the activity over the course of 16 weeks. When role-playing as co-researchers, the pupils choose their own research question and research methods. The process of this research game was documented in 16 field notes, two interviews with the participating teachers, and several observations. This data was analysed according to Goffman’s and Mead’s concepts of role. The findings indicate that several factors affect pupils’ engagement in the role of co-researchers: being perceived as professionals, interacting and communicating in a new location and setting, giving and receiving feedback, and being recognised through the results obtained. The study contributes to the understanding that a design focused on such factors can facilitate children’s participation.

Designing with Teachers

Contrasting Teachers’ Experiences of the Implementation of a Gamified Application for Foreign Language Learners

Series:

Caroline Cruaud

Abstract

Developing new gamified educational resources or educational games takes time, and it is natural to want to ensure the success of their integration in the classroom. For this reason, it is important to look at the role of the teacher before and during the implementation. However, research on gamification and game-based learning has been focused on students, and very little has been said about teachers (Kenny & McDaniel, 2011). This study contrasts two teachers’ experiences of the implementation of a gamified app with regard to their participation in the design process. Interviews with teachers and video data from the classroom have been analysed to find out how the teachers experienced the implementation and in what ways their involvement in the project is reflected in their respective experiences and in the accounts of their experiences. The analysis reveals that the two teachers have had very different experiences of the implementation. Where the first teacher developed familiarity with and ownership over the application, the second teacher felt lost and stopped using it. Involving teachers through co-design or using flexible instructional designs has advantages, but other factors should be considered when implementing new resources (e.g., class context, teachers’ previous experience, teacher training). This study opens up new questions on the teacher’s role in the integration of games and gamified applications in the classroom but also raises the issue of their potential participation in the design of new resources.

Series:

Edited by Hans Christian Arnseth, Thorkild Hanghøj, Thomas Duus Henriksen, Morten Misfeldt, Robert Ramberg and Staffan Selander

Foreword : James Paul Gee

Series:

Edited by Hans Christian Arnseth, Thorkild Hanghøj, Thomas Duus Henriksen, Morten Misfeldt, Robert Ramberg and Staffan Selander

Foreword : James Paul Gee

Series:

Staffan Selander, Victor Lim Fei, Mats Wiklund and Uno Fors

Abstract

Digital games and simulations for learning are not new phenomena. However, with the advancements in technology, they have gathered increasing interest over recent years. With digital ubiquity, games and simulations offer a compelling case for use in schools. As such, it is useful to understand the value and issues related to the use of digital games and simulations for learning as well as to develop a new frame for thinking on how to design learning in educational settings, harnessing the affordances of technology through the effective use of digital games and simulations.

Game-Based Learning in the Dialogical Classroom

Videogames for Collaborative Reasoning about Morality and Ethics in Citizenship Education

Series:

Filipa de Sousa

Abstract

This chapter focuses on game-based learning (GBL), and the way a commercial videogame was used to foster collaborative reasoning about morality and ethics in citizenship education. A high school class was video recorded for four weeks, and the data was analyzed to investigate how students collaboratively reasoned in the GBL situation. Post-interview data were also considered. The study found that collaborative reasoning was mediated both by the videogame and the dialogical interactions facilitated by the teacher. Students appropriated both bottom-up and top-down reasoning processes and positioned themselves to anchor practical and conceptual knowledge. This research proposes a learning model that describes the anchoring process as an important tool for promoting content understanding and collaborative reasoning in learning across contexts with GBL.

Games as Tools for Dialogic Teaching and Learning

Outlining a Pedagogical Model for Researching and Designing Game-Based Learning Environments

Series:

Hans Christian Arnseth, Thorkild Hanghøj and Kenneth Silseth

Abstract

In this chapter we introduce an analytic and normative model of how games can be used as part of dialogic teaching and learning practices in the classroom. In our research during the last few years, we have been analysing how students makes sense of computer games in educational contexts. We have also been concerned with design-based research and with implementing games into more complex learning designs. Based on our experiences we wanted to focus more explicitly on teaching and the importance of the teacher in realizing the potentials of game-based learning. We found that more context sensitive models for implementing games into teaching and learning practices were lacking. Our model is grounded in a sociocultural and dialogic approach to meaning making and we discuss important concepts from this theory such as voice, utterance and artifact. We argue that we cannot expect that games themselves have particular effects on pedagogy and learning. On the contrary, the potentials of games needs to be realised in practice. We also contextualize and ground our argument in international research and in our own studies on the use of games in classrooms, and we argue that games can provide teachers with interesting means for creating more active and reflective learning experiences for students in the classroom. Our learning design model emphasize the interrelationship between instructional categories and it represents a model for planning and carrying out teaching with games in classrooms. Having said that, it can also be a useful model for analysing how games work as part of complex learning ecologies.

Series:

Thomas Duus Henriksen

Abstract

This chapter examines how group processes unfold while playing a learning game for adults. Through the study of a Swedish deployment of ‘The EIS Simulation’, which is a collaborative learning game on change management and overcoming organisational resistance, it is shown how social processes emerge and affect the group’s decision-making process. The chapter proposes an analytical distinction between two levels of interaction, which both affect decision-making, and consequently the learning process. The primary processes concern the direct interaction with the game, and governed by its mechanics. The secondary processes emerge among participants as a consequence of the game, but become governed by emergent social mechanics. From this distinction, the chapter finds that while secondary mechanics take up a significant proportion of the time spent playing, they offer an opportunity for a multitude of processes to unfold that are crucial to adult learning.

Introduction

Scandinavian Perspectives

Series:

Hans Christian Arnseth, Thorkild Hanghøj, Thomas Duus Henriksen, Morten Misfeldt, Robert Ramberg and Staffan Selander

Learning and Design Processes in a Gamified Learning Design

Students Creating Curriculum-Based Digital Learning Games

Series:

Charlotte Lærke Weitze

Abstract

This design-based research project investigated how a gamified learning design could enable adult learners to design digital games while implementing and thereby reaching learning goals from their curriculum. The aim was to develop a reusable learning design for upper secondary teachers and students who are game-design novices. The gamified learning design supported the innovative learning processes for the students, and the teacher participated as an inspirational guide for the students as they designed curriculum-based learning games. This chapter describes the learning design, how the teachers contributed to the students’ cognitively complex learning processes, and how four parallel types of processes for designing and learning supported this gamified learning design. The study took place in a hybrid synchronous learning environment. The project revealed that the students experienced deep and motivating learning and that the teachers found this problem-based and activating learning design inspiring and easy to use as a variation to more traditional teaching approaches.