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In: Discovering the Religious Dimension of Trauma
In: Discovering the Religious Dimension of Trauma
In: Discovering the Religious Dimension of Trauma
In: Discovering the Religious Dimension of Trauma
In: Discovering the Religious Dimension of Trauma
In: Discovering the Religious Dimension of Trauma
In: Discovering the Religious Dimension of Trauma
Author:

Abstract

The problem of the relation between author and text may be seen as the lynchpin in considering how biblical texts constitute God’s Word. The traditional and romantic equating of authors and texts causes some problems and requires a divine inspiration for the authors writing the holy texts of the Bible. The concept of intentio operis, invented by Umberto Eco, makes room for an understanding of the Bible as the Word of God for a modern reader, without sacrificium intellectus. The intentio operis claims that a text is different from the author and that the meaning of the text is more than the will of the author – an autonomous entity of its own. This “surplus” of a text could be attributed to God and could be a way of dealing with a text written by human hands as a divine “utterance,” allowing for the biblical concept of “God as word.” The intentio operis contains meaning for the reader, but it can never be fully reached by the reader. Neither is God at humans’ disposal. Being polysemous and polyvalent, the intentio operis offers a pluralistic perspective for different people – and sets a limit on interpretation as well.

In: Biblical Exegesis without Authorial Intention?
Author:

Abstract

This chapter is a plea for thinking together about the text, the author, the intentio auctoris and the intentio operis. In this field of interrelated terms, the quest for the author functions as a particular hermeneutical tool beside others that inspires a dialogue between the reader, viz., interpreter and the text.

In: Biblical Exegesis without Authorial Intention?
In: Biblical Exegesis without Authorial Intention?