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Abstract

In his last book Chaosmosis, Felix Guattari (1995, p. 129) argues that both “intellectuals and artists have got nothing to teach anyone,” and that they produce “toolkits composed of concepts, percepts and affects, which diverse publics will use at their convenience.” In this video presentation and accompanying article, the authors explore Guattari’s claim as a provocation for visual pedagogy and play with the idea that an artist might have nothing to teach anyone in relation to the idea of visual pedagogies. And, then, what happens when an artist and a teacher talk about visual pedagogies? To open up a dialogue, they employ the cliché, ‘I don’t know much about art but I know what I like’. This statement invites thoughts on the tensions between truth-telling, disciplinarity, and affect. Here the authors take the cliché a step further within the context of visual pedagogies and meaning making. They position this dialogue with the cinematic art work, Flight (2018), which aims to give the viewer a different sensation of the world, to render the familiar unfamiliar, and to let things be (Roder & Sturm, 2017), in order to think differently.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Buckingham’s analysis of children’s media cultures, exploring content created for young people as well as how children and young people are constructed as consumers. The chapter closes with an exploration of a contemporary phenomenon, the micro-video sharing platform, TikTok, and how it can be used as a topic for advancing media literacy.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham

Abstract

This discusses Buckingham’s latest work on young people’s media cultures. This chapter makes space to discuss lingering gaps in media literacy research and ways to address them. The chapter ends with a discussion of the current COVID pandemic and how Buckingham’s theories and practices have helped the author better understand the current climate.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Buckingham’s work that addresses how children and young people learn. It details how Buckingham broke away from the prevailing theories of media literacies and details the action research grounded in classrooms. The chapter also explores how media literacy can be brought into the classroom to build children and young people’s learning more effectively.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham

Abstract

This chapter introduces David Buckingham and articulates his role as a leader in studies of media literacy education and children’s media cultures. It defends the importance of studying the media. The chapter outlines Buckingham’s intellectual trajectory and shares information on his major contributions.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Buckingham’s major contributions to the field of children and youth cultures and media literacy education. Attention is paid to doing critical analysis, resisting binary effects arguments, and exploring the role of technology. Within these subsections are discussions of representations of sex and violence, concerns about childhood obesity, and the role of data mining in digital media and educational technologies.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham

Abstract

This chapter covers Buckingham’s intellectual background, including a discussion of his theoretical underpinnings. This chapter also shares definitions of media literacy and emphasizes the concepts of media literacy codified by Buckingham and colleagues. Lastly, the chapter emphasizes the importance of context in media analysis.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the second key strain of Buckingham’s research: What children and young people already know about the media and their media choices. It focuses on how children’s and young people’s relationships with media can be understood in their own social environments, and how they express their knowledge.

In: Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham
Author: Romaine Logere

Abstract

One of the challenges to an increased rationalism within educational discourse has been a rethinking of mind-body relations. While there has been considerable discussion around what is implicated through the engagement of physical and theoretical sites of knowing, methodological difficulties related to how its resultant data might be meaningfully evidenced remain. Based on fieldwork conducted on a post-qualitative approach to transdisciplinary practice the author provides an account of a visual research method developed specifically to illustrate non-verbal experiences of group ideation. Writing from the position of a creative practitioner and intimate insider, the author explores how this positionality supported the role of bodily knowing in her research and the ways in which bodily experience offered utility to this research endeavour. The author concludes with a reflection on visualisation as a method to capture non-cognitive data and areas indicated through felt data for further exploration.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author: Maggie Haggerty

Abstract

This article draws on research conducted for the author’s PhD study and concepts in semiotic multimodality and relational materialism (; ) to explore the dynamics of what partnering with video/visual technologies in educational research with young children can be, do and become. This study was an ethnographic study which examined the curriculum and assessment priorities six focus children in Aotearoa-New Zealand encountered during their last six months in an early childhood (EC) centre and their first six months at school. In the article the author focuses on two video-recorded observations included in the PhD report by way of opening up for critical consideration the entanglements of possibility, risk and ethical responsibility entailed in the use of video in research with young children.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy