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Author: Boris Liebrenz
Arab Traders in their Own Words explores for the first time the largest unified corpus of merchant correspondence to have survived from the Ottoman period. The writers chosen for this first volume were mostly Christian merchants who traded within a network that connected the Syrian and Egyptian provinces and extended from Damascus in the North to Alexandria in the South with particular centers in Jerusalem and Damietta. They lived through one of the most turbulent intersections of Ottoman and European imperial history, the 1790s and early 1800s, and had to navigate their fortunes through diplomacy, culture, and commerce. Besides an edition of more than 190 letters in colloquial Arabic this volume also offers a profound introductory study.
Social and Cultural Constructs of Hakka Identity in Modern and Contemporary Fujian, China
Sabrina Ardizzoni’s book is an in-depth analysis of Hakka women in tulou villages in Southeast China. Based on fieldwork, data acquired through local documents, diverse material and symbolic culture elements, this study adopts an original approach that includes historical-textual investigation and socio-anthropological enquiry. Having interviewed local Hakka women and participated in rural village events, public and private, in west Fujian’s Hakka tulou area, the author provides a comprehensive overview of the historical threads and cultural processes that lead to the construction of the ideal Hakka woman, as well as an insightful analysis of the multifaceted Hakka society in which rural women reinvent their social subjectivity and negotiate their position between traditional constructs and modern dynamics.
Volume Editors: Ana Simões and Maria Paula Diogo
Why write a book about science, technology, and medicine in Lisbon? No one questions the value of similar studies of European capital cities such as Paris or London, but they are not reflective of the norm. Alongside its unique characteristics, Lisbon more closely represents the rule and deserves attention as such. This book offers the first urban history of science, technology and medicine in Lisbon, 1840-1940. It addresses the hybrid character of a European port city, scientific capital and imperial metropolis. It discusses the role of science, technology, and medicine in the making of Lisbon, framed by the analysis of invisibilities, urban connections, and techno-scientific imaginaries. The book is accompanied by a virtual interactive map.
The Pirate's Way
Author: Arne Zuidhoek
The romantic picture of pirates as colourful individuals terrorizing the “seven seas” has long eclipsed historical fact. The Pirate Encyclopedia contains the most complete body of data available on the rovers’ rightful legitimacy as subjects of investigation. For the first time we see so many pirates (c. 7.000) brought together. This pirate’s who’s who, including the women pirates, makes it possible to see different areas and their significance and circumstances, and so the essential companion for scholars, students and a general audience intrigued by tales and facts.
Saying that horses shaped the medieval world – and the way we see it today – is hardly an exaggeration. Why else do we imagine a medieval knight – or a nomadic warrior – on horseback? Why do we use such metaphors as “unbridled” or “bearing a yoke” in our daily language? Studies of medieval horses and horsemanship are increasingly popular, but they often focus on a single aspect of equestrianism or a single culture. In this book, you will find information about both elite and humble working equines, about the ideology and practicalities of medieval horsemanship across different countries, from Iceland to China.
Contributors are Gloria Allaire, Luise Borek, Gail Brownrigg, Agnès Carayon, Gavina Cherchi, John C. Ford, Loïs Forster, Jürg Gassmann, Rebecca Henderson, Anna-Lena Lange, Romain Lefebvre, Rena Maguire, Ana Maria S. A. Rodrigues, and Alexia-Foteini Stamouli.
Volume Editor: Anti Selart
The Baltic Crusades in the thirteenth century led to the creation of the medieval Livonia. But what happened after the conquest? The contributors to this volume analyse the cultural, societal, economic and technological changes in the Baltic Sea region c. 1200–1350. The chapters focus on innovations and long-term developments which were important in integrating the area into medieval European society more broadly, while also questioning the traditional divide of the Livonian post-crusade society into native victims and foreign victors. The process of multilateral negotiations and adaptions created a synthesis which was not necessarily an outcome of the wars but also a manifestation of universal innovation processes in northern Europe.
Contributors are Arvi Haak, Tõnno Jonuks, Kristjan Kaljusaar, Ivar Leimus, Christian Lübke, Madis Maasing, Mihkel Mäesalu, Anti Selart, Vija Stikāne, and Andres Tvauri.
Rituals and ceremonies played a significant role in medieval society by both establishing continuity with previous generations and their legacy, and temporarily allowing individuals to step out of their everyday routine. This is true for local communities, villages, convents, castles and cities, but also, for kingdoms and empires. Despite its importance, ritual in medieval Central Europe has not yet been studied to a great extent.

In this volume, seven contributions deal with various examples and aspects of rituals in the late medieval Bohemian lands. The individual contributions explore particular rituals (coronation, wedding, funeral) or environments (cities, nobility, court, church). They share innovative interpretations and newly elaborated sources.

Contributors are: Antonín Kalous, František Šmahel, Martin Čapský, Martin Nodl, Robert Šimůnek, Tomáš Borovský, and Václav Žůrek.
Author: Erik Odegard
How did individuals advance to the highest ranks in the Dutch colonial administrations? And how, once appointed, was this rank retained? To answer these questions, this book explores the careers of Dutch colonial governors in the 17th century with a focus on two case-studies: Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen, governor of Dutch Brazil (1636-1644) and Rijckloff Volckertsz van Goens, Governor-General in Batavia in the 1670s.

By comparing a Western (Atlantic, WIC) and an Eastern (Asian, VOC) example, this book shows how networks sustaining career-making differed in the various parts of the empire: the West India Company was much more involved in domestic political debates, and this led to a closer integration of political patronage networks, while the East India Company was better able to follow an independent course. The book shows that to understand the inner workings of the Dutch India companies, we need to understand the lives of those who turned the empire into their career.
In Trust in the Catholic Reformation Thérèse Peeters shows how trust and distrust affected reform attempts in the post-Tridentine Church, while offering a multifaceted account of day-to-day religiosity in seventeenth-century Genoa, a city that has been generally overlooked in Anglophone scholarship. The book addresses diverse aspects of early modern Catholicism among lay people and members of the clergy. The author replaces the traditional view of the Catholic Reformation as a top-down process with one that considers individual agency, highlighting how strategies for gaining and maintaining trust – as well as the processes by which trust could be lost or denied – determined the success or failure of various efforts at reforming the Church.
This volume presents Greek Maritime History and unravels the historical trajectory of a maritime nation par excellence in the Eastern Mediterranean. At the core of the book lies the rise of the Greek merchant fleet and its transformation from a peripheral to an international carrier. Following the evolution of Greek shipping for more than three centuries (17th-20th century), the book traces a maritime nation in its making and provides proof of a different, yet successful pattern of maritime development compared to other European maritime nations. The chapters adopt a multidimensional and interdisciplinary approach – spanning from shipping, fishing and trade to piracy, technology, human resources and entrepreneurship – and reflect the main directions of Greek maritime historiography over the last thirty years.

Contributors are: Apostolos Delis, Dimitris Dimitropoulos, Zisis Fotakis, Katerina Galani, Gelina Harlaftis, Evdokia Olympitou, Gerassimos D. Pagratis, Alexandra Papadopoulou, Socrates Petmezas, Evrydiki Sifneos, Anna Sydorenko, Ioannis Theotokas, and Katerina Vourkatioti.