Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 18 items for :

  • Encyclopedia x
  • Middle East and Islamic Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Primary Language: English x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Die Geheimnisse der oberen und der unteren Welt ( The Secrets of the Upper and the Lower World) is a substantial new collection of essays on magic in Islamic cultural history. Both comprehensive and innovative in its approach, this book offers fresh insights into an important yet still understudied area of Islamic intellectual history. The seventeen chapters deal with key aspects of Islamic magic, including its historical developments, geographical variants, and modern-day practices. The general introduction identifies and problematizes numerous sub-topics and key practitioners/theoreticians in the Arabo-Islamic context. This, along with terminological and bibliographical appendices, makes the volume an unparalleled reference work for both specialists and a broader readership. Contributors: Ursula Bsees, Johann Christoph Bürgel, Susanne Enderwitz, Hans Daiber; Sebastian Günther, Mahmoud Haggag, Maher Jarrar, Anke Joisten-Pruschke, Fabian Käs, Ulrich Marzolph, Christian Mauder, Tobias Nünlist, Khanna Omarkhali, Eva Orthmann, Bernd-Christian Otto, Dorothee Pielow, Lutz Richter-Bernburg, Johanna Schott & Johannes Thomann.
Penal Codes and Supreme Court Case Law under Numayrī and Bashīr
Author: Olaf Köndgen
In The Codification of Islamic Criminal Law in the Sudan, Olaf Köndgen offers an in-depth analysis of the Sudan’s Islamized penal codes of 1983 and 1991, their historical, political, and juridical context, their interpretation in the case law of the Supreme Court, and their practical application. He examines issues that arise in sharīʿa criminal law, including homicide, bodily harm, unlawful sexual intercourse ( zinā, liwāṭ), rape, unfounded accusation of unlawful sexual intercourse ( qadhf), highway robbery ( ḥirāba), apostasy ( ridda), and alcohol consumption.

Drawing on a wide range of primary and secondary sources, a large number of previously untapped Supreme Court cases, and interviews with judges and politicians, Köndgen convincingly explains the multiple contradictions and often surprising aspects of one of the Arab world’s longest lasting applications of codified sharīʿa criminal law.

Olaf Köndgen won the DAVO Dissertation Prize 2014 for his Ph.D. thesis.

"This extremely well-documented study represents a milestone for the discussion of Islamic criminal law in the Muslim world as a whole and in the Sudan especially. Olaf Köndgen fills an academic void; his work deserves the greatest recognition, for its extraordinary quality, its thoroughness and systematic approach."
Prof. Günter Meyer, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Rashda:The Birth and Growth of an Egyptian Oasis Village is an interdisciplinary study from a multi-perspective, using various kinds of data and information. It offers a comprehensive description of Rashda, a village in Dakhla Oasis in Egypt from its beginning to the present. Key concepts are the uncertainty of the water supply, the dependence on the political regime and the rational behaviour of individuals. The villagers of Rashda have dealt with the difficult natural circumstances by creating the local customs of irrigation and cultivation. The development of village recently depends ever more on the government, as long as large amounts of finance and superior technology are necessary to dig deeper wells to secure water for cultivation.
The Religious Architecture of Non-Muslim Communities Across the Islamic World
This book examines non-Muslim religious sites, structures and spaces in the Islamic world. It reveals a vibrant portrait of life in the religious sites by illustrating how architecture responds to contextual issues and traditions. Sacred Precincts explores urban context; issues of identity; design; construction; transformation and the history of sacred sites and architecture in Europe, the Middle East and Africa from the advent of Islam to the 20th century. It includes case studies on churches and synagogues in Iran, Turkey, Cyprus, Egypt, Iraq, Tunisia, Morocco and Malta, and on sacred sites in Nigeria, Mali, and the Gambia.

With contributions by Clara Alvarez, Angela Andersen, Karen Britt, Karla Britton, Jorge Manuel Simão Alves Correia, Elvan Cobb, Daniel Coslett, Mohammad Gharipour, Mattia Guidetti, Suna Güven, Esther Kühn, Amy Landau, Ayla Lepine, Theo Maarten van Lint, David Mallia, Erin Maglaque, Susan Miller, A.A. Muhammad-Oumar, Meltem Özkan Altınöz, Jennifer Pruitt, Rafael Sedighpour, Ann Shafer, Jorge Manuel Simão Alves Correia, Ebru Özeke Tökmeci, Steven Thomson, Heghnar Watenpaugh, Alyson Wharton and Ethel S. Wolper.
The Arabic script in Africa contains sixteen papers on the past and present use of Arabic script to write African languages. These writing traditions, which are sometimes collectively referred to as Ajami, are discussed for single or multiple languages, with examples from all major linguistic phyla of Africa but one (Khoisan), and from all geographic areas of Africa (North, West, Central, East, and South Africa), as well as a paper on the Ajami heritage in the Americas. The papers analyze (ethno-) historical, literary, (socio-) linguistic, and in particular grammatological aspects of these previously understudied writing traditions and exemplify their range and scope, providing new data for the comparative study of writing systems, literacy in Africa, and the history of (Islam in) Africa.
Author: Ian Campbell
Labyrinths, Intellectuals and the Revolution traces the development of the postcolonial Arabic-language Moroccan novel from its roots in travel narratives and autobiography into its more mature period of stylistic and thematic diversity in the early 1970s. This study first undertakes an exploration of the political, social and artistic conditions under which the genre developed, then moves to close readings of each of the formative texts, grouped by theme. The analysis of these texts centers around their spatial practices: there is a tension between the labyrinthine space of the street, which deflects legibility, and the sacred interior within the blank walls, wherein a certain equality of gaze and power can be perceived.
Morocco, Gibraltar and Great Britain in the 18th and 19th Centuries
The Strait of Gibraltar is a ubiquitous symbol of the supposed dividing line between Europe and the Muslim world. This book re-evaluates that perception with reference to new archival evidence about the links between the Gharb region of Morocco and Gibraltar and the establishment of the Moroccan consulate there, focusing on the period around 1750-1850. It shows the development of a complex set of political, social and economic relationships across the strait that connected Morocco to Gibraltar and beyond. In the light of this evidence, the book challenges prevailing arguments that emphasise the isolationist impulses of the Moroccan sultanate and Moroccan society, and highlights the extent to which European expansion in this period was shaped by local responses.
Author: Cleo Cantone
This book constitutes a seminal contribution to the fields of Islamic architectural history and gender studies. It is the first major empirical study of the history and current state of mosque building in Senegal and the first study of mosque space from a gender perspective. The author positions Senegalese mosques within the field of Islamic architectural history, unraveling their history through pre-colonial travelers’ accounts to conversations with present-day planners, imams and women who continually shape and reshape the mosques they worship in. Using contemporary Dakar as a case study, the book’s second aim is to explore the role of women in the “making and remaking” of mosques. In particular, the rise of non-tariqa grass-roots movements (i.e.: the “Sunni/Ibadou” movement) has empowered women (particularly young women) and has greatly strengthened their capacity to use mosques as places of spirituality, education and socialization. The text is aimed at several specialized readerships: readers interested in Islam in West Africa, in the role of women in Islam, as well as those interested in the sociology and art-history of mosques.
This work presents a study of the history and identity of the Moroccan Bayruk family. The first part of the book gives an outline of the main referents in both the Bayruk vision of ‘self’, and academic discourses on Maghribian history: the dynasty, caravan and ‘tribe’. It identifies discrepancies in scholarly presentations of the Bayruk and traces them back to two overlapping issues of translation and conception. For the remainder of the book a variety of sources are used to highlight the role of textuality in the creation of the Bayruk image in academic discourse. As a result this book demonstrates how the Bayruk family can be used as a case-study to revise the existing interpretations of Maghribian history and modes of identification.
Religious Change among Oromo Muslims in Bale, Ethiopia
Author: Terje Østebø
The political transition in 1991 and the new regime’s policy towards the ethnic and religious diversity in Ethiopia have contributed to increased activities from various Islamic reform movements. Among these, we find the Salafi movement which expanded rapidly throughout the 1990s, particularly in the Oromo-speaking south-eastern parts of the country. This book sheds light on the emergence and expansion of Salafism in Bale. Focusing on the diversified body of situated actors and their role in the process of religious change, it discusses the early arrival of Salafism in the late 1960s, follows it through the Marxist period (1974-1991) before discussing the rapid expansion of the movement in the 1990s. The movement’s dynamics and the controversies emerging as a result of the reforms are discussed, particularly with reference to different understandings of sources for religious knowledge and the role of Islamic literacy.