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Emblematics and the Brazilian Avant-Garde (1920-30s)
Author:
In Antropofagia, Aarnoud Rommens shows how this Brazilian avant-garde movement (1920-30s) deconstructed early tendencies in the European vanguard. Through imaginative re-readings, the author reinterprets Antropofagia’s central texts and images as elements within an ever-changing, neo-baroque memory palace. Not only does the movement subvert established conceptions of the pre- and postcolonial; it is also a counter-colonial critique of verbal and visual literacy. To do justice to the dynamic between visibility and legibility, Rommens develops the inventive methodology of ‘emblematics’. The book’s implications are wide-ranging, prompting a revaluation of the avant-garde as a transmedial tactic for disrupting our reading and viewing habits.
Is there a special place for the Low Countries in art history’s current debates on global mobility? How should we conceive of the globalization of Netherlandish art in the early modern period, and in what ways does the distinctively worldly orientation of the Netherlands in this period contribute to early modern visual culture? This volume examines how artworks produced in the wake of European expansion—art produced in the Netherlands in reaction to the world outside of Europe and art made outside of Europe in reaction to encounters with the Netherlands—helps us better understand the cultural impacts of globalization.
Children and Cultural Capital in the Americas
A class of child artists in Mexico, a ship full of child refugees from Spain, classrooms of child pageant actors, and a pair of boy ambassadors revealed facets of hemispheric politics in the Good Neighbor era. Culture-makers in the Americas tuned into to children as producers of cultural capital to advance their transnational projects. In many instances, prevailing conceptions of children as innocent, primitive, dependent, and underdeveloped informed perceptions of Latin America as an infantilized region, a lesser "Other Americas" on the continent. In other cases, children's interventions in the cultural politics, economic projects, and diplomatic endeavors of the interwar period revealed that Latin American children saw themselves as modern, professional, participants in forging inter-American relationships.
Shaping Identities between Networks and Patronage (c. 1530-1690)
Author:
In this volume Giulia Zanon sheds new light on our grasp of social hierarchy and the possibilities for social mobility in pre-modern Italy. By adopting an interdisciplinary approach that combines deep archival research with a multitude of artistic and architectural artefacts, this work breaks new ground by contextualizing the part played by social relationships and the arts in publicly affirming and displaying the prestige of the middling sorts, the cittadini, in early modern Venice.
Civic virtues were central to early modern Nürnberg’s visual culture. These essays in this volume explore Nürnberg as a location from which to study the intersection of art and power. The imperial city was awash in emblems, and they informed most aspects of everyday life. The intent of this collection is to focus new attention on the town hall emblems, while simultaneously expanding the purview of emblem studies, moving from strict iconological approaches to collaborations across methodologies and disciplines.
A Complex Relationship
Volume Editors: and
Colours make the map: they affect the map’s materiality, content, and handling. With a wide range of approaches, 14 case studies from various disciplines deal with the colouring of maps from different geographical regions and periods. Connected by their focus on the (hand)colouring of the examined maps, the authors demonstrate the potential of the study of colour to enhance our understanding of the material nature and production of maps and the historical, social, geographical and political context in which they were made.

Contributors are: Diana Lange, Benjamin van der Linde, Jörn Seemann, Tomasz Panecki, Chet Van Duzer, Marian Coman, Anne Christine Lien, Juliette Dumasy-Rabineau, Nadja Danilenko, Sang-hoon Jang, Anna Boroffka, Stephanie Zehnle, Haida Liang, Sotiria Kogou, Luke Butler, Elke Papelitzky, Richard Pegg, Lucia Pereira Pardo, Neil Johnston, Rose Mitchell, and Annaleigh Margey.
The Discalced Carmelites in Italy and Their Mission to Persia and the East Indies
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Teresa of Ávila's cult was dramatically disseminated in previously unknown celebrations honoring her beatification (1614) and canonization (1622) in Italy and Portuguese Asia, the purview of her Discalced Carmelite Order's Italian Congregation. Reconstructions and analyses of the festivities in Genoa, Rome, Naples, Hormuz, and Goa center on the presentation of Teresa's gender, deeds, virtues, and miracles. The geopolitical roles played by religious, secular, and family networks in particularizing and propagating Teresa's universal cult are emphasized. The desired goal of converting Muslims and Hindus is addressed in light of attitudes toward ethnic and religious diversity shared by lay and ecclesiastical authorities.
In a new approach to Goethe's Faust I, Evanghelia Stead extensively discusses Moritz Retzsch's twenty-six outline prints (1816) and how their spin-offs made the unfathomable play available to larger reader communities through copying and extensive distribution circuits, including bespoke gifts. The images amply transformed as they travelled throughout Europe and overseas, revealing differences between countries and cultures but also their pliability and resilience whenever remediated.
This interdisciplinary investigation evidences the importance of print culture throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in nations involved in competition and conflict. Retzsch's foundational set crucially engenders parody, and inspires the stage, literature, and three-dimensional objects, well beyond common perceptions of print culture's influence.

This book is available in open access thanks to an Institut Universitaire de France (IUF) grant.