Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Literature and Cultural Studies x
  • Literary Theory x
  • Primary Language: English x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Literary, Cultural and Political Essays, 2009–2021
Author:
Crisis and Criticism is a series of interventions from 2009 to 2021 engaging with the literary, cultural and political responses to the capitalist crisis of 2007–8. Challenging the tendency to treat crisis as natural and beyond human control, this book interrogates our cultural understanding of crisis and suggests the necessity of ruthless criticism of the existing world. While responses to crisis have retreated from the critical, choosing to inhabit apocalyptic fantasies instead, only a critical understanding of the causes of crisis within capitalism itself can promise their eventual overcoming.
Volume Editors: and
Joe Andrew and Robert Reid assemble thirteen analytical discussions of Tolstoi’s key works, written by leading scholars from around the world. The works studied cover almost the entire length of Tolstoi’s creative career, from some of his earliest stories of the 1850s (The Sevastopol Stories), to those of his last period, including posthumous publications (The Kreutzer Sonata and Father Sergius). Particular attention is paid to his two masterpieces, War and Peace and Anna Karenina. All the studies are based on the most recent developments in cultural theory. The reader of this work will gain new and unique insights into this unparalleled genius of world literature, especially into the methods used to create the works that retain immense importance for us today.

Contributors: Joe Andrew, Eric de Haard, Rose France, Helena Goscilo, Jane Gary Harris, Katalin Kroó, Irina Makoveeva, Deborah Martinsen, Robin Feuer Miller, Robin Milner-Gulland, Audun Mørch, Donna Tussing Orwin, Olga Sobolev, Diane Oenning Thompson
Volume Editors: and
Incompletion is an essential condition of cultural history, and particularly the idea of the fragment became a central element of Romantic art. Through its resistance to classicist ideals it continued being of high relevance to the various strands of modernist and contemporary aesthetics. The fourteen essays in this volume, based on the 2017 Stockholm conference of the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA), for the first time address incompletion in a wide range of literary and musical texts, from Baudelaire and Flaubert through Tolstoy and Henry James to Bachmann, Jelinek and Janet Frame, from Nietzsche and Chopin through Russolo and Puccini to Rihm and Kurtàg. Two further essays deal with topical general issues in the field of word and music studies.

Contributors:

Delia da Sousa Correa, The Open University, United Kingdom.
Peter Dayan, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Ivan Delazari, HSE University in St. Petersburg, Russia.
Rolf J. Goebel, The University of Alabama, USA.
Michael Halliwell, The University of Sydney, Australia.
Christin Hoene, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Ruth Jacobs, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Lawrence Kramer, Fordham University, USA.
Bernhard Kuhn, Bucknell University, USA.
Margaret Miner, The University of Illinois Chicago, USA.
Beate Schirrmacher, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
David Francis Urrows, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong.
Laura Vattano, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Erik Wallrup, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Werner Wolf, University of Graz, Austria.
In Pathos, Poetry and Politics in Michel Houellebecq's fiction, Russell Williams examines the literary style of France's most notorious novelist. Houellebecq is frequently the focus of debate for his provocative comments about Islam and the decline of Western civilisation. This book refocuses attention on how such provocation is an integral part of the texture of his novels.
Williams considers Houellebecq's writing about literature and outlines the key principles of the author's poetics, founded on an acute sensitivity to reading experience. He then explores Houellebecq's earliest poetry before mapping this poetic voice into his subsequent fiction, including Sérotonine (2019). Houellebecq's relationship with genre fiction and the crucial issue of the authorial persona that exists in and around his texts are also explored.