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Gregorio a San Vicente and the Flemish Jesuit Mathematics School
Author: Ad J. Meskens
This book shows that the Flemish Jesuit Mathematics School had profound influence on the course of mathematics in the seventeenth century. Manuscript evidence shows that its professor, Gregorio of San Vicente SJ, had developed a logically sound integration method more than a decade before Cavalieri, but in the 1620s was forbidden to publish by his superiors.
San Vicente’s students were dispersed all over Europe, through them his methods influenced numerous mathematicians, Leibniz and Huygens among them. Many of these students became famous mathematicians in their own right. Ad Meskens convincingly shows, by carefully tracing their careers and outlining their biographies, that their contributions to mathematics, mechanics, optics and architecture were more often than not ground breaking.
This selected translation of Blue Book of Chinese Education 2016 reviews China’s education development in 2015. Chapter one offers an overview. Chapters two to four examine rural education in China, including the education of the left-behind children, compulsory education in rural areas, and the working condition of rural teachers. Chapters five to eleven cover educational services, education reform, non-governmental education, training program for teachers, teaching of traditional Chinese culture, the basic values of high-school students, and school bullying. The last three chapters are survey reports of compulsory education development in Chinese cities, math and science education for ethnic minority populations, and education authorities’ attitudes toward reform. The seven appendices provide important supplementary materials.
Empowerment, Gender and Development in an African Movement
In Matarenda/Talents in Zimbabwean Pentecostalism, the fourteen contributors to this multidisciplinary collection reflect on how Pentecostalism contributes to the empowerment of marginalised societies, how it empowers women in particular through the matarenda (talents) principles, and how it contributes to the development of wider society. All but three of the authors are Zimbabwean Pentecostals.

The book deals with such subjects as gender equality, economics and finance, poverty alleviation and sustainable development, education, and entrepreneurship. A remarkable independent Zimbabwean church has harnessed biblical principles from the Parable of the Talents to empower women and those marginalised by economic disasters. It is particularly relevant for understanding the potential of African Pentecostalism in dealing with social and economic challenges.
The focus of this volume is on illuminating how local educational traditions developed in particular contexts around the world before or during the encounter with European early modern culture. In this vein, this volume breaks from the common narrative of educational historiography privileging the imposition of European structures and its consequences on local educational traditions. Such a narrative lends to historiographical prejudice that fosters a distorted image of indigenous educational cultures as “historyless,” as if history was brought to them merely through the influence of European models. Fifteen multi-disciplinary scholars globally have contributed with surveys and perspectives on the history of local traditions in countries from around the globe before their own modernities.

Contributors include: Guochang Shen, Yongyan Wang, Xia Shen, Gaétan Rappo, Sunghwan Hwang, Jan S. Aritonang, Mere Skerrett, Saiyid Zaheer Husain Jafri, Zackery M. Heern, Judith Francis Zeitlin, Layla Jorge Teixeira Cesar, Mustafa Gündüz, Igor Fedyukin, Edit Szegedi , Inese Runce, Sigurður Gylfi Magnússon, and Davíð Ólafsson.
Author: Alexis Kokkos
We live in a socio-cultural reality which is dominated by an entrepreneurial and instrumental rationality, as well as by a discriminative and populist mentality. Questioning the validity of taken-for-granted sovereign perspectives is thus of vital importance. Our contact with art can serve as a pathway through which we might be empowered to identify false life values and develop the disposition and ability to challenge them.

The learning potential of aesthetic experience is, however, barely exploited within educational systems. In addition, although major scholars have contributed to a deeper understanding of the liberating dimension of processing important artworks, there has been surprisingly little discussion in the relevant literature focusing on educational practice.

Exploring Art for Perspective Transformation provides a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of theoretical views pertaining to the emancipatory process of exploring art. Moreover, it presents the educational method Transformative Learning through Aesthetic Experience (TLAE), with reference to particular examples of implementation. TLAE is addressed to adult educators and school teachers regardless of the subject they teach and their theoretical background on aesthetics. It involves engaging learners in exploring works from fine arts, literature, theatre, cinema and music with a view to promoting critical reflection on one’s potentially problematic perspectives.
This volume addresses a gap in previous research and to explore Nordic textbooks chronologically and empirically from the Protestant Reformation to our present time. The chapters are written by scholars from universities in Finland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway, countries that distinguish themselves for a rich tradition of textbook research. The authors represent different academic traditions and use a wide range of scholarly methods and perspectives. The overall objective is to highlight how textbooks reflect national educational policies and legislation. The various chapters cast light on everyday life in school and demonstrate how textbooks have contributed to nation-building and to strengthening the nations’ core values and other major political projects.

Contributors are: Karl Christian Alvestad, Norunn Askeland, Kjell Lars Berge, Peter Bernhardsson, Kerstin Bornholdt, Mads B. Claudi, Henrik Edgren, Morten Fink-Jensen, Stig Toke Gissel, Thomas Illum Hansen, Pirjo Hiidenmaa, Marthe Hommerstad, Axel Hörstedt, Kari-Anne Jørgensen-Vittersø, Tujia Laine, Esbjörn Larsson, Ragnhild Elisabeth Lund, Christina Matthiesen, Eva Maagerø, Tuva Skjelbred Nodeland, Kari H. Nordberg, Merethe Roos, Henriette Hogga Siljan, Johan Laurits Tønnesson and Janne Varjo.
Author: D. G. Mulcahy
Gen Ed locates serious discussion of general education in the context of some of the day-to-day realities encountered in putting it into practice and promoting efforts at reform at Metropolitan Atlantic University (aka the Metro). This dual focus is found in the often-pugnacious policy debate among the faculty and a more light-hearted discussion of related questions carried on by Professor Kelly as he models Socratic teaching in his upper-level class for prospective teachers. Reforming general education at the Metro is not free of the vanities and vulgarities of ambitious men and women and self-serving politicians, of course, nor those who poke fun at them. Arnie Smatter, the irrepressible and nosey chat show host of Radio YOY ensures that this does not go unnoticed.

The overall humorous tone of Gen Ed does not detract from Mulcahy’s thoughtful treatment of substantive issues that will be of interest to serious scholars, students, and a general readership. It is the behaviour of those involved, the broader media and political contexts in which events take place, which mainly becomes the object of humorous treatment.
A Guidebook of Practices, Claims, Issues, and Implications
In this volume, the author offers an exploratory analysis of the history of homeschooling in the United States, current curricular practices, religious and political rationales for homeschooling, a critique of the claims by homeschooling advocates that the practice leads to greater efficiency and effectiveness, and what homeschooling and individualistic-oriented approaches mean for society.

Teaching the next generation at home is, with little doubt, the oldest form of educating children. Yet, this simplistic understanding of “homeschooling” does not adequately capture the growth of homeschooling as a practice in the 21st century nor is it a widely accessible form of “school choice” for most families. While many parents keep their children out of formal schooling – public and private – for myriad reasons, what is clear is that homeschooling is the epitome of a conceiving of education as an individualistic good – a commodity – that can, or should, be done outside of a conception of the common good, a reasonable understanding of teaching as a profession, and the elevation of ideological echo chambers of information which can have deleterious impacts on the students who are homeschooled and society, broadly.