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This book places the Ottoman Empire within the global context and provides insight into the multifaceted transimperial and transnational connections that characterized it in different periods. It focuses on the connections, interactions, exchanges, networks and flows in and around the Ottoman Empire. Contributions in the book reflect the evolving and dynamic nature of the Ottoman Empire from different angles.

Contributors are Ali Atabey, Serpil Atamaz, Lee Beaudoen, Emine Evered, Kyle Evered, Richard Eaton, Ziad Fahmy, Gülsüm Gürbüz-Küçüksarı, Onur İnal, Christine Isom-Verhaaren, Myrsini Manney-Kalogera, Claudia Römer, Alexander Schweig, Gül Şen, Baki Tezcan, Fariba Zarinebaf.
D’une Herméneutique de la Nature à une Sémiotique de la Culture
Author:
Salah Natij's book, Al-Jahiz's Theory of Bayân: From a Hermeneutics of Nature to a Semiotics of Culture is the first comprehensive study entirely devoted to the Bayān theory (communication, hermeneutics, semiology) elaborated in the middle of the ninth century by the Arab encyclopedist and polygrapher al-Jāḥiẓ (d. 255 H./ 869). It is a work that restores to the Jāḥiẓian theory of bayān its originality by showing that it does not constitute a simple linguistic rhetoric (Balāgha), having the verbal statement (Lafẓ) as its sole object, but a hermeneutic-semiological perspective that studies not only speech (lafẓ), but also all types of signs that living beings, human and non-human, produce, emit and use to communicate or adapt to their living environment.
Editor / Translator:
Nahj al-Balāghah, the celebrated compendium of orations, letters, and sayings of ʿAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib (d. 40/661) compiled by al-Sharīf al-Raḍī (d. 406/1015), is a masterpiece of Arabic literature and Islamic wisdom studied and memorized avidly and continually for over a thousand years. Showcasing ʿAlī’s life and travails in his own words, it also transcribes his profound reflections on piety and virtue, and on just and compassionate governance. Tahera Qutbuddin’s meticulously researched critical edition based on the earliest 5th/11th-century manuscripts, with a lucid, annotated facing-page translation, brings to the modern reader the power and beauty of this influential text, and confirms the aptness of Raḍī’s title, “The Way of Eloquence.”
A Relational View on Artistic Practices from Africa and the Diaspora
The present volume brings together contributions which explore artworks – including literature, visual arts, film and performances – as dynamic sites of worlding. It puts emphasis on the processes of creating or doing worlds, implying movement as opposed to the boundary drawing of area studies. From such a processual perspective, Africa is not a delineated area, but emerges in a variety of relations which can reach across the continent, but also the Indian Ocean, the Atlantic or Europe.

Contributors are: Thierry Boudjekeu, Elena Brugioni, Ute Fendler, Sophie Lembcke, Gilbert Ndi Shang, Samuel Ndogo, Duncan Tarrant, Kumari Issur, CJ Odhiambo, Michaela Ott, Peter Simatei, Clarissa Vierke, Chinelo J. Enemuo.
Beautifying the Ugly and Uglifying the Beautiful by Abū Manṣūr al-Thaʿālibī (d. 429/1038)
In his Beautifying the Ugly and Uglifying the Beautiful (Taḥsīn al-qabīḥ wa-taqbīḥ al-ḥasan) the prolific anthologist al-Thaʿālibī (d. 429/1038) offers a thematically arranged selection of Arabic poems and prose anecdotes or sayings with contrary or paradoxical purport, such as praise of miserliness, boredom, sickness, and death, or condemnation of generosity, intelligence, youth, and music. The book is both entertaining and informative, giving insight in premodern Arab and Islamic culture. It contains a new edition of the Arabic text and a complete English translation (the first in any language) with extensive annotation, preceded by an introduction with the necessary background of the genre.
Journey and Topography
Author:
Editor / Translator:
This book presents the English translation of a travelogue by an Armenian intellectual of the end of the 19th century. Originally written in a variety of non-normative Western Armenian, it serves as a valuable repository of highly important and unique data on the ethno-demography of the historical region of Dersim, the traditional habitat of Armenians and the Zaza people. The account vividly portrays the urban and rural settlements, their precise topography, and the enchanting landscape of mountains and rivers, which hold a significant place in the folk imagination and sacral world of the highland dwellers.
In this book, Doris Behrens-Abouseif responds to the Mamluk chroniclers whose loquacity regarding clothing matters demands our attention. Using a multiplicity of sources including chronicles, European and Muslim travel narratives, popular storytelling, legal treatises, literature, and poetry, Behrens-Abouseif delves into the details of Mamluk dress. Whether as a vehicle for the sultanate’s self-representation both internationally and domestically or as an expression of religious and social identities, status and wealth, female assertion, urban culture, and artistic creativity, clothing personified the broad Mamluk social spectrum. Replete with colorful anecdotes and copious illustrations, Dress and Dress Code in Medieval Cairo offers a lively and comprehensive study of this fascinating topic.