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When was male domination established in human societies, and why did it take hold? How does humanity's most remote past inform today's feminist struggle?
This new, updated edition of Primitive Communism Is Not What It Used to Be – available for the first time in English translation – represents a timely contribution to the debate, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of ethnology and archaeology.
While noting the many outdated aspects of Morgan and Engels' seminal work, this vast synthesis, guided by a rigorous materialist approach, renews Marxist analysis on a theme that is at once remote and pressingly topical.
This book places the Ottoman Empire within the global context and provides insight into the multifaceted transimperial and transnational connections that characterized it in different periods. It focuses on the connections, interactions, exchanges, networks and flows in and around the Ottoman Empire. Contributions in the book reflect the evolving and dynamic nature of the Ottoman Empire from different angles.

Contributors are Ali Atabey, Serpil Atamaz, Lee Beaudoen, Emine Evered, Kyle Evered, Richard Eaton, Ziad Fahmy, Gülsüm Gürbüz-Küçüksarı, Onur İnal, Christine Isom-Verhaaren, Myrsini Manney-Kalogera, Claudia Römer, Alexander Schweig, Gül Şen, Baki Tezcan, Fariba Zarinebaf.
Work, Ideology, and Film under Socialism in Romania examines the cinematic architecture of work imaginary as developed through films produced between 1960 and 1989. This book provides rich insight into the intimate configuration of cinematic thinking of work and displays of this form of social life, with focus on the relationship between conceived and lived ideology of work during socialist modernization, on the relationship between individuals and political power in the (reflexive) experiences, and contexts of work.
Toward an Anthropological History of Emotion and Its Social Management
This multi-contributor volume examines the evolving relationship between fear, heterodoxy and crime in traditional China. It throws light on how these three variously interwoven elements shaped local policies and people’s perceptions of the religious, ethnic, and cultural “other.”
Authors depart from the assumption that “otherness” is constructed, stereotyped and formalized within the moral, political and legal institutions of Chinese society. The capacity of their findings to address questions about the emotional dimension of mass mobilization, the socio-political implications of heterodoxy, and attributions of crime is the result of integrating multiple sources of knowledge from history, religious studies and social science.
Contributors are Ágnes Birtalan, Ayumu Doi, Fabian Graham, Hung Tak Wai, Jing Li, Hang Lin, Tommaso Previato, and Noriko Unno.
Edward Abramowski’s Social Philosophy. With a Selection of His Writings
Translator:
The Metaphysics of Cooperation presents the intellectual achievements of the Polish associative socialist and pioneer of social sciences, Edward Abramowski. The volume is divided into five sections, each of them contains an analysis of Polish philosopher’s work according to the issues he dealt with: sociology, ethics, politics, cooperativism, and psychology. Each part also contains a selection of his writings. Its intention is to show Abramowski’s works in the context of global intellectual history and to include them in the current political debates. Abramowski makes fraternity or cooperation the main concepts of his social metaphysics. The Polish version of cooperativism can be inspiring both for contemporary researchers and political activists in the post-economic-crisis Europe. It also opens up a space for creating more democratic political and economic institutions.
Beyond hegemonic thoughts, the Post-Western sociology enables a new dialogue between East Asia (China, Japan, Korea) and Europe on common and local knowledge to consider theoretical continuities and discontinuities, to develop transnational methodological spaces, and co-produce creolized concepts. With this new paradigm in social sciences we introduce the multiplication of epistemic autonomies vis-à-vis Western hegemony and new theoretical assemblages between East-Asia and European sociologies. From this ecology of knowledge this groundbreaking contribution is to coproduce a post-Western space in a cross-pollination process where “Western” and “non-Western” knowledge do interact, articulated through cosmovisions, as well as to coproduce transnational fieldwork practices.
Global Capitalism in Post-millennial North American Fiction
Author:
If it is indeed impossible to think beyond capitalism, then capital has become reality. If global capitalism organizes reality through the stories it weaves, capital is (as strong as) its fictions. If capital is reality and capital is fiction, then reality as such is fiction as well. It is by reading this fiction for both patterns and inconsistencies that contemporary individuals can challenge global capital and unveil its hypocrisies; and it is by fighting fiction with fiction, i.e. projecting new realities – such as those in the post-millennial novels by William Gibson, Douglas Coupland, and Dave Eggers – that people can imagine the world anew.
Author:
In a seemingly offhand, often overlooked comment, Karl Marx deemed ‘human corporeal organisation’ the ‘first fact of human history’. Following Marx’s corporeal turn and pursuing the radical implications of his corporeal insight, this book undertakes a reconstruction of the corporeal foundations of historical materialism. Part I exposes the corporeal roots of Marx’s materialist conception of history and historical-materialist Wissenschaft. Part II attempts a historical-materialist mapping of human corporeal organisation. Suggesting how to approach human histories up from their corporeal foundations, Part III elaborates historical-materialism as ‘corporeal semiotics’. Part IV, a case study of Marx’s critique of capitalist socio-economic and cultural forms, reveals the corporeal foundations of that critique and the corporeal depth of his vision of human freedom and dignity.
Notions of Europe and the European among Participants in EU Cultural Initiatives
In this book, Tuuli Lähdesmäki, Katja Mäkinen, Viktorija L. A. Čeginskas, and Sigrid Kaasik-Krogerus scrutinize how people who participate in cultural initiatives funded and governed by the European Union understand the idea of Europe. The book focuses on three cultural initiatives: the European Capital of Culture, the European Heritage Label, and a European Citizen Campus project funded through the Creative Europe programme. These initiatives are examined through field studies conducted in 12 countries between 2010 and 2018. The authors describe their approach as ‘ethnography of Europeanization’ and conceptualize the attempts at Europeanization in the European Union’s cultural policy as politics of belonging.