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U.S. and Soviet Cultural Diplomacy, 1945–1990
In Cold War in Universities: U.S. and Soviet Cultural Diplomacy, 1945–1990 Natalia Tsvetkova recounts how the United States and the Soviet Union aspired to transform overseas academic institutions according to their political aims during the Cold War.
The book depicts how U.S. and Soviet attempts to impose certain values, disciplines, teaching models, structures, statutes, and personnel at universities in divided Germany, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, both Vietnams, and Cuba as well as Guatemala were foiled by sabotage, ignorance, and resistance on the part of the local academic elite, particularly professors.
Often at odds with local academic communities, U.S. and Soviet university policies endured unexpected frustrations as their efforts toward Americanization and Sovietization faced developmental setbacks, grassroots resistance, and even political fear.
Author: Qiquan Zhong
Translator: Hua Wan
The authors of Greek and Roman philosophical protreptic imitate a kind of exhortation initially associated with Socrates, creating the thread of typically protreptic intertextuality that classifies protreptic as a genre of philosophical literature. Tracing this intertextuality from the Socratic authors to Boethius, the book shows how Greek and Roman protreptics define philosophy as a revisionary form of education, articulate the ultimate goals of this education, and associate their authors and audiences with philosophy as a new discursive practice and a new way of living. These texts constitute the first chapter in the history of educational revision and thus offer thoughts that continue to inform every debate on educational goals.
Editor: Stephen Rowley
European Perceptions of China and Perspectives on the Belt and Road Initiative is a collection of fourteen essays on the way China is perceived in Europe today. These perceptions – and they are multiple – are particularly important to the People’s Republic of China as the country grapples with its increasingly prominent role on the international stage, and equally important to Europe as it attempts to come to terms with the technological, social and economic advances of the Belt and Road Initiative.

The authors are, on the whole, senior academics specializing in such topics as International Relations and Security, Public Diplomacy, Media and Cultural Studies, and Philosophy and Religion from more than a dozen different European countries and are involved in various international projects focussed on Europe-China relations.
Volume Editor: Lauren Cifuentes
The rapid rise of e-learning worldwide means that campuses are creating new positions in distance learning leadership, often at the vice-president or vice-provost level. Frequently, those applying for such positions are recently graduated doctoral students or faculty members who have never served in administration. Unlike any other book to date, this Guide to Administering Online Learning provides easy access to an overview of tasks to be accomplished or maintained and perspectives to consider in order to direct dynamic online initiatives. In it, experienced distance learning teachers and administrators share their insights regarding what must be done to administer effective online learning, including theoretical insights as well as practical principles. They provide comprehensive guidelines for addressing issues and needs that distance learning administrators currently face: barriers to adoption, policies, legalities, ethics, strategic planning, emerging technologies, design of professional development, management of the course development process, quality assurance, student support, and recruitment and marketing. This book is a timely offering from those who have effectively led distance learning initiatives for those who are interested in leading distance learning for the next generation of learners. Each chapter includes questions, prompts, or activities to help readers relate the concept to their own experiences.
Volume Editors: Radhika Iyengar and Christina T. Kwauk
The global education community, guided for decades by the concept of Education for Sustainable Development, has done little to support the radical transformation of education systems needed to respond to climate change. Part of this inertia rests in five roadblocks to quality education identified in a Brookings report, and about which stakeholders from the fields of ESD, GCED, GE, and HR education came together in April 2020 to begin discussing ways of addressing.

This edited volume picks up that conversation by laying out elements of a shared vision, or roadmap, for the global education sector in climate action. The volume includes perspectives that span multiple continents, disciplines, and positionalities within the education system – from policymakers to teachers to youth. It curates exiting literature, surfaces in-depth case studies, and presents overviews of conceptual frameworks on a diverse range of topics relating to systems transformation, monitoring and accountability mechanisms, lessons from the field, teacher support, as well as activism and advocacy by students.

Curriculum and Learning for Climate Action: Toward an SDG 4.7 Roadmap for Systems Change offers researchers, practitioners, donors, and decisionmakers insights into entry points for education systems change needed to reorient our relationship with our planetary systems.
K-8 Lesson Plans for Ecological and Social Change
Eco-Mathematics Education strives to show how everyone can experience the embedded connection between mathematics and the natural world. The authors’ sincere hope is that by doing so, we can radically change the way we come to understand mathematics, as well as humanity’s place in the ecosystem. The book hopes to accomplish this by providing in-depth lesson plans and resources for educators and anyone interested in teaching and learning mathematics through an ecological aesthetic perspective. All lessons are based on the inquiry method of teaching, aligned to standards, incorporate art projects inspired by famous artists, and utilize recycled and/or natural materials as much as possible.
Religious Orders and Their Schools in Early Modern Italy (1500–1800)
Author: David Salomoni
In Educating the Catholic People, David Salomoni reconstructs the complex educational landscape that arose in sixteenth-century Italy and lasted until the French Revolution. Over three centuries, various religious orders, both male and female, took on the educational needs of cities and states on the Italian peninsula, renewing the traditional humanist pedagogy. Historians, however, have not attempted to produce a synthesis on this topic, focusing mainly on the pedagogical activities of the Jesuits and neglecting the contributions and innovations of other groups. This book addresses this historiographical gap, providing a new chapter in the comparative study of pre-modern education.