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Proceedings of the Online Conference Hosted by the University of Cambridge on 20 October 2020
Volume Editor:
Seven new scholarly essays present original research that includes rare historical and photographic materials highlighting the significance of Islamic civilization and its vexed legacy in a variety of contemporary European countries and challenging the perception of European identity as exclusively Christian. This volume unearths a rich, complex history of relationships between Muslims and Christians in Europe whose value lies in the close and continued connections between them that began so long ago on European soil.
It is a well-established fact nowadays that modernity impacts Islam, but there has not been much focus on how modernity impacts the Qur’ān, the foundational text of Islam and the verbatim word of God. This book argues that the early Muslim Qur’ān translations into English are attempts to reconcile the Qur’ān with modernity by producing translations that encompass modern concepts and interpretations of the Qur’ān. Are these modern concepts and interpretations valid or they alter the word of God? This is the main question that the book attempts to answer, particularly that these early translations have affected and still affect Qur’ān translation.
A Critical Edition and Translation of Evagrius Ponticus’ Kephalaia Gnostika in Arabic
In the late fourth century, the early Christian monk and author Evagrius Ponticus wrote his magnum opus in Greek—entitled Kephalaia Gnostika (“Gnostic Chapters”)—a spiritual treatise on ascetic contemplation and unity with God. After Evagrius’ death, however, his theology attracted controversy, and many of his writings were suppressed or destroyed. As a result, complete copies of this important work principally survived only in Syriac translation, until the recent discovery of two Arabic copies at the so-called Monastery of the Syrians in Egypt. The present volume represents the first-ever critical edition and translation of the Kephalaia Gnostika in that language.
Author:
This volume is both a continuation of the five already published titles in the series (2011–21) and an addition to the Concise Dictionary of Novel Medical and General Hebrew Terminology from the Middle Ages. It continues mapping the medical terminology featured in medieval Hebrew medical works in order to facilitate study of medical terms that do not appear in the existing dictionaries as well as identifying the medical terminology used by specific authors and translators in order to identify anonymous medical material.

The terminology discussed in this volume has been derived from fourteen different sources, including translations of Ibn al-Jazzār’s Zād al-musāfir by Moses ibn Tibbon (Sefer Ṣedat ha-Derakhim) and the otherwise unknown Abraham ben Isaac (Sefer Ṣedah la-Oreḥim), as well as the translation of Constantine the Africanʼs Latin version (Viaticum) prepared by Do’eg ha-Edomi (Sefer Yaʾir Netiv).
In Science of the Soul in Ibn Sīnā’s Pointers and Reminders, Michael A. Rapoport provides a philological and interpretive guide for critically reading and interpreting Ibn Sīnā’s (Avicenna, d. 1037) most challenging and influential text. Rapoport argues that chapters VII-X of the Pointers present scientific explanations for phenomena related to the human soul – from intellection to divination, magic, and marvels – within the framework of Ibn Sīnā’s Metaphysics of the Rational Soul. This book dispels widespread notions that the Pointers represents Ibn Sīnā’s mystical or Sufi philosophy and therefore stands apart from the rest of his corpus.