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In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Editor-in-Chief: Ralph W. Hood
Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Psychology presents extended articles focused on theory and the integration of empirical data that bridge the gap between humanities studies and those of psychological science. Firm boundaries associated with disciplines concerned with religion and psychology are difficult to define and rapidly developing research strategies are in need of critical in-depth presentation that explores how various approaches to psychology are contributing to a broader understanding of religion in what some have claimed is a secular and others a post-secular age.

This series will be directed to a wide audience of students, scholars, and active researchers seeking up-to-date information on the diversity of approaches and methods that psychologists are applying to illuminate the wide range of phenomenon that either define or are associated with religion in individual cultures and globally. Published quarterly, each peer-reviewed issue will consist of one uniquely focused article of approximately 40,000 words. Individual issues will also be made available as a standalone book in both print and electronic format.

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In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 26 
In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 26 

The article describes one individual's journey with analytical psychology from the time that Jung was still alive until the present. The author began his career in psychiatry one year after Jung's death, having met Jung prior to his death. He has experienced what it has meant to be Jungian for the past 49 years, and how the image of Jung has changed over that period of time. His experience is mainly in the English-speaking world but also as president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (IAAP) he has experienced the growth of analytical psychology around the world.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
In: International Journal of Jungian Studies

ABSTRACT

In The Lament of the Dead, James Hillman quotes Foucault as saying there are two ways to escape ‘the box of contemporary thinking’. One path lies through erudition, the other through the indigenous experience. While the history of Jung's ideas has been thoroughly explored, we understand little about his encounters with indigenous people in the American Southwest. For example, the literature on his visit to Taos Pueblo is riddled with misleading information. Part of the problem begins with Jung's own confusion regarding his contact at Taos with Antonio Mirabal. Not only did Jung wrongly believe that Mirabal was an ‘Indian chief’; he misspelled and mistranslated his Tiwa name, Ochwiay Biano. Although the encounter could be described (at one level) as superficial, Jung refers to it as one of the most important experiences of his life. This paper will explore what Jung seems to have encountered in Taos, and the ways his experience were orchestrated by the unseen presence of others (including Mabel Dodge Lujan, D.H. Lawrence, and Jaime de Angulo). Archival records and news accounts from the 1920s show that although Jung imagined he was meeting face to face with a ‘primitive' who still lived in the world of ‘participation mystique’, Mirabal was a gifted Native American impresario who later visited one American president and turned down an invitation to visit a second. I argue that the complex of colonialism surrounding Jung's relationship with Mirabal has infected subsequent encounters between the Jungian tradition and indigenous people.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies