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Greek is a morphology-dependent stress system, where stress is lexically specified for a number of individual morphemes (e.g., roots and suffixes). In the absence of lexically encoded stress, a default stress emerges. Most theoretical analyses of Greek stress that assume antepenultimate stress to represent the default (e.g., Malikouti-Drachman & Drachman 1989; Ralli & Touratzidis 1992; Revithiadou 1999) are not independently confirmed by experimental studies (e.g., Protopapas et al. 2006; Apostolouda 2012; Topintzi & Kainada 2012; Revithiadou & Lengeris in press). Here, we explore the nature of the default stress in Greek with regard to acronyms, given their lack of overt morphology and fixed stress pattern, with a goal of exploring how stress patterns are shaped when morphological information (encapsulated in the inflectional ending) is suppressed. For this purpose, we conducted two production (reading aloud) experiments, which revealed, for our consultants, first, an almost complete lack of antepenultimate stress and, second, a split between penultimate and final stress dependent on acronym length, the type of the final segment and the syllable type of the penultimate syllable. We found two predominant correspondences: (a) consonant-final acronyms and end stress and (b) vowel-final acronyms and the inflected word the vowel represents, the effect being that stress patterns for acronyms are linked to the inflected words they represent only if enough morphonological information about the acronym’s segments is available to create familiarity effects. Otherwise, we find a tendency for speakers to prefer stress at stem edges.

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

The aim of this paper is to investigate ‘eînai (‘be’) plus dative’ and ‘eînai plus genitive’ possessive constructions, paying special attention to the semantic content of the verb eînai in order to identify the function and the distribution of the various combinatorial patterns of the constructions in question, and the precise role of the verbal items. In particular, the present analysis, carried out within the framework of Construction Grammar, will attempt to demonstrate that each possessive variant constitutes a semantically and pragmatically distinct pattern where the semantic content of the verb eînai is the result of form-meaning configurations over and above the morpheme and word level. From this perspective, the cluster of semantic, pragmatic and morpho-syntactic values attributed to participant slots constitutes an integral part of constructions.

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics
The Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Language and Linguistics (EAGLL) brings together the latest research from across a range of disciplines contributing to our knowledge of Ancient Greek. The EAGLL offers a systematic and comprehensive treatment of all aspects of the history and study of Ancient Greek, comprising detailed descriptions of the language from Proto-Greek to koine. It addresses linguistic aspects from several perspectives, including history, structure, individual singularities, biographical references, schools of thought, technical meta-language, sociolinguistic issues, dialects, didactics, translation practices, generic issues, Greek in relation to other languages, etc., and on all levels of analysis including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, semantics, stylistics, etc. It also includes all the necessary background information regarding the roots of Greek in Indo-European. As and when, excursions may be made to later stages of the language, e.g. Byzantine or even later. The focus, however, will predominantly be Ancient Greek. With well over 500 entries on all aspects of Ancient Greek, this new encyclopedia is the authoritative reference work for students and researchers of Ancient Greek, general linguistics, Indo-European languages, and Biblical literature.

The online version of the EAGLL can be found here.
This volume is about the morphosyntactic encoding of feelings and emotions in Latin. It offers a corpus-based investigation of the Latin data, benefiting from insights of the functional and typological approach to language. Chiara Fedriani describes a patterned variation in Latin Experiential constructions, also revisiting the so-called impersonal constructions, and shows how and why such a variation is at the root of diachronic change. The data discussed in this book also show that Latin constitutes an interesting stage within a broader diachronic development, since it retains some ancient Indo-European features that gradually disappeared and went lost in the Romance languages.
Philology is one of the most investigated fields of Armenian studies. At the end of the twentieth century, it was important to provide an overview of the main achievements and on the methodological approaches implemented in this field till now. This is the aim of the present publication. Part I focuses on the manuscripts, the inscriptions, and the printings. Its second section is devoted to the textual criticisms and the third section explores the interface between linguistics and philology. Case studies form the core of Part II. One chapter offers an overview on the 17th-19th centuries, and two articles are devoted to the conditions of the circulation of the literary production in the 20th century, both in Western and Eastern Armenian.
CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014
Library Journal Best Print Reference Selection 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and broad cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this 800,000 word two-volume work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available ONLINE.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacré, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.
The internal ordering of Latin noun phrases is very flexible in comparison with modern European languages. Whereas there are a number of studies devoted to the variable placement of modifiers, The Noun Phrase in Classical Latin Prose proposes an entirely new approach: a discussion of the semantic and syntactic properties of both nouns and modifiers. Using recent insights in general linguistics, it argues that not only pragmatic factors but also semantic factors (whether we are dealing with an inherent property, the author’s assessment, or a further specification of a referent) are responsible for the internal ordering of Latin noun phrases. Additionally, this book discusses prepositional phrases functioning as modifiers, and appositions, which have received little attention in the literature.
In: Methods in Latin Computational Linguistics
In: Armenian Philology in the Modern Era
In: Armenian Philology in the Modern Era