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Intervening in the current debate about an overemphasis on the individual in classical psychoanalytic trauma theory and the demand for a prioritization of the group in postcolonial trauma studies, this article proposes that Anton Nimblett’s short stories ‘Ring Games’ and titular ‘Sections of an Orange’ from his 2009 collection invite a postcolonial, post-Jungian optic because they portray the devastating effects of a colonized creative unconscious on the characters’ Self, relationships, and the collective. Both short stories explore the traumatic impact of colonialism and neoliberalism on the development of the characters’ unconscious and consciousness, unveiling the obstacles to re-inscribing a traditional heteronormative, Euro- American image of masculinity; individuating as gay; and living an authentic life. Questioning the binary opposites of the individual and the group, both short stories gesture towards the importance of creative self-realization as one cornerstone of individual and collective health when healing the destructive impact of postcolonial and neoliberal power configurations.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies

ABSTRACT

The Haida, a First People of British Columbia, evolved over 3000 years an art form which is rich in archetypal images. Most Northwest Coast anthropologists study only the form of Haida art, but Wilson Duff and George MacDonald have pursued its meaning using terms that echo analytical psychology. In this paper, I argue that the structure of shamanic cosmology and Haida moieties parallel the distinction in the human psyche which Marie-Louise von Franz called the Unconscious Above and the Unconscious Below. The ‘marriage of opposites’, the reconciliation of Logos and Eros, Duff saw symbolized in Haida art by the Copper, which I call the ‘Haida Anthropos’. Using this parallel with the chthonic and the celestial, I then amplify the myth of ‘Eagle Chain and Giant Clam’ as it was portrayed in two argillite totem poles, which I argue show the peripeteia and lysis of the myth.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
In: International Journal of Jungian Studies

ABSTRACT

Jung understands Eckhart’s religious experience to culminate in a point of unqualified identity between ego and unconscious, and so, effectively, between the divine and the human. This identity occurs in an undifferentiated pool of infinite energy, prime matter, whose archetypal differentiation becomes the substance of history as the numinous manifests in religion and its secular equivalents. The dynamic of history becomes the repeated emanation of consciousness from and its return to its source. Effectively Jung is affirming the eternity of matter as potential and so as energy. In two accounts of the history of religion Jung suggests the current emergence of a surpassing myth of humanity and divinity as mutual creators engaged in reciprocal redemption as the meaning of history itself. Jung’s revisionary perspective reveals the danger to the species of the monomind, religious or political, as a premature and truncated claim to the exhaustion of archetypal manifestation. It extends the sacred to every existent as an expression of its origin/ground. It presents the hope of a more encompassing sympathy based on the recognition of the commonality of origin of personal and collective faiths and their constant need to transcend parochial claims to exhaustive finality.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
In: International Journal of Jungian Studies

ABSTRACT

The author investigates a notion of self as political possibility from a multi-displinary perspective that engages the psychoanalytic and philosophical thought of Jung, Žižek, Badiou and Heidegger. The political subject is one who has encountered the real of a particular societal void through the neighbor's unbidden appeal and is thus violently wrenched out of the indifference of banal **existence into a possibility of political action in a world gone mad. To illuminate her theoretical arguments, the author includes her own auto-ethnographic study into the conditions from which an egalitarian-based clinic of care emerged amidst the horror of the AIDS plague when there was no societal support in place. Lastly, the author engages Heidegger's (secondarily Jung and Badiou's) secular reading of the apostle Paul's Christian revolution as a means of elaborating on the transcendental dimension of thought and the conditions for its collective and co-experienced political possibility in today's moment in history.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies

ABSTRACT

For over seven hundred years, the legend of the Pied Piper has inspired folk tales, poems, songs, and theatrical productions, as well as speculations about whether the legend is based upon actual events that occurred on 26 June 1284, the date given to the incident according to several commemorative documents and monuments found in the town of Hamelin, Germany, where the legend originated. Many scholars who have studied the legend believe it has little to do with a Pied Piper ridding the town of rats and later enticing the town's children to follow him out of town where they all disappear; instead, they believe the incident refers to a military recruiter who either led a troupe of young men to the Baltic or to Transylvania to establish settlements there. However, other scholars put great significance upon the date of the event and how it might be related to a summer solstice celebration gone awry. The following article provides evidence to support the summer solstice theory, presenting information relating to ancient solar bird traditions that link the piper with shamanic rites in which shamans dress as birds and perform bird sacrifices associated with both summer and winter solstice celebrations.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies