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Papers in Honour of Elizabeth Coatsworth
Volume Editors: Gale Owen-Crocker and Maren Clegg Hyer
A monastic artist with an unusual enthusiasm of male buttocks and genitalia; a nun bringing her spinning equipment from her home in the south to her new convent in the north; the riddle of a carved archer bearing a book instead of arrows; a bishop’s ring hiding in its design symbols of the essential aspects of the Christian faith: these are some of the secrets of early medieval personal and public worship uncovered in this book.
In tribute to a scholar who is herself a polymath of early medieval studies, these chapters explore approaches which have particularly engaged her: stone sculpture; text; textiles; manuscript art; metalwork; and archaeology. With a brief foreword by Professor Dame Rosemary Cramp.

Contributors are Richard N. Bailey, Michelle P. Brown, Peter Furniss, Jane Hawkes, David A. Hinton, Maren Clegg Hyer, Catherine E. Karkov, Alexandra Lester-Makin, Christina Lee, Donncha MacGabhann, Éamonn Ó Carragáin, Gale R. Owen-Crocker, Frances Pritchard, and Penelope Walton Rogers.
From Jerusalem to Rome—and Back
Editor: Steven Fine
The Arch of Titus: From Jerusalem to Rome—and Back explores the shifting meanings and significance of the Arch of Titus from the Jewish War of 66–74 CE to the present—for Romans, Christians and especially for Jews. Built by triumphant Romans, this triumphal monument was preserved by medieval Christians, lauded by modern visitors and dictators and imitated around the world. The Arch of Titus has special significance for the once-defeated Jews. Its menorah is now the national symbol of modern Israel.

The Arch of Titus: From Jerusalem to Rome—and Back assembles an international array of scholars to explore the Arch in all of its complexity. This volume celebrates an exhibition mounted at Yeshiva University Museum and is the final statement of the Yeshiva University Arch of Titus Project.
Religious Narratives in Contemporary Culture: Between Cultural Memory and Transmediality analyses the meaning and role of religion in western cultural practices in the twenty-first century. This inquiry situates itself at the intersection between cultural memory studies and the transmedial study of narrative and art. Contributors focus on genres which have yet to receive significant critical attention within the field, including speculative fiction films and television series, autobiographical prose and poetry, and action-adventure video games. In this time of crisis, where traces of religious thinking still persist in the presence or absence of religious faith, this volume’s collective look into some of their cultural embodiments is necessary and timely. The volume is addressed primarily to scholars and students interested in intersections between religious and cultural studies, revisions of traditional religious narratives, literature as a space of reflection on today's world, contemporary media studies and remediation.

Maria-Sabina Draga Alexandru's editing work in the last stages of this volume was supported by a grant of the Romanian Ministry of Education and Research, CNCS – UEFISCDI, project number PN-III-P3-3.6-H2020-0035.
Author: Zhange Ni
In this selective overview of scholarship generated by The Hunger Games—the young adult dystopian fiction and film series which has won popular and critical acclaim—Zhange Ni showcases various investigations into the entanglement of religion and the arts in the new millennium. Ni introduces theories, methods, and the latest developments in the study of religion in relation to politics, audio/visual art, new media, material culture, and popular culture, whilst also reading The Hunger Games as a story that explores the variety, complexity, and ambiguity of enchantment. In popular texts such as this, religion and art—both broadly construed, that is, beyond conventional boundaries—converge in creating an enchantment that makes life more bearable and effects change in the world.
Author: Sage Elwell
This slim volume offers a thematic exploration of religion and the digital arts. Over the course of six brief sections, this extended essay examines identity and community, authority and authenticity, word and image, ritual and practice, body and space, and myth and faith. Each of these paired sets is explored in concert with technologically inflected correlates. For instance, identity and community are paired with avatars and networks. These twin concepts provide the thematic anchor of each section. Each section looks at four works of digital art with each work employing digital technology in a unique way. The works include virtual and augmented reality pieces, 3D printed sculptures, digital photography, and digitally enabled performance pieces and installations and span the late 1990s to the present. This essay is an introduction to religion and the digital arts and, while no single conclusion can be drawn from such an expansive and diverse field, the reassertion of the religious and theological importance of the body and emotions in the face of digital technology emerges as a recurrent theme.
Author: Tobias Nünlist
Schutz und Andacht im Islam befasst sich mit handschriftlichen Dokumenten in Rollenform, die zwischen dem 14. und 19. Jh. entstanden sind. Die vorgestellten Belegstücke stammen aus unterschiedlichen geographischen Kontexten: a. Städtedreieck Tabriz-Konya-Bagdad; b. persischer Kulturraum; c. Osmanisches Reich. Diese Rollen waren bei Angehörigen von Männerbünden (Sufi-Orden, Futuwwa- und Aḫī-Gruppierungen, Gilden) beliebt. Die Studie untersucht das auf diesen Dokumenten verwendete textliche und ge¬stalterische Vokabular. Neben Passagen aus dem Koran (auch vollständige Abschriften) lassen sich oft Gebete und weitere Texte frommen Inhalts feststellen. Gelegentlich finden sich Hinweise, dass die Dokumente aus heterodoxen Umfeldern stammen. Die Studie unterstreicht ausserdem den hohen kunsthistorischen Wert der vorgestellten Belegstücke, die oft für Angehörige von gesellschaftlichen Eliten angefertigt worden sind. Devotion and Protection in Islam deals with hand-written documents in the scroll format dating from the 14th–19th centuries. These documents can be attributed to various geographic contexts: a. the triangle between the cities of Tabriz, Konya and Baghdad; b. the Persianate world; c. the Ottoman Empire. These scrolls were appreciated by members of different associations ( Männerbünde; e.g. Sufi orders, Futuwwa and Aḫī groups). This study analyses the textual and ornamental vocabulary applied on the scrolls. The copied texts mostly comprise passages from the Quran and prayers. Certain features suggest that such scrolls were often produced in heterodox environments. Additionally, this study underscores the high art-historical value of these documents, particularly appreciated by members of the ruling elite.
Author: Thomas Barrie
In Architecture of the World’s Major Religions: An Essay on Themes, Differences, and Similarities, Thomas Barrie presents and explains religious architecture in ways that challenge predominant presumptions regarding its aesthetic, formal, spatial, and scenographic elements. Two positions frame its narrative: religious architecture is an amalgam of aesthetic, social, political, cultural, economic, and doctrinal elements; and these elements are materialized in often very different ways in the world’s principal religions. Central to the work’s theoretical approaches is the communicative and discursive agency of religious architecture, and the multisensory and ritual spaces it provides to create and deliver content. Subsequently, mythical and scriptural foundations, and symbols of ecclesiastical and political power are of equal interest to formal organizations of thresholds, paths, courts, and centers, and celestial and geometric alignments. Moreover, it is equally concerned with the aesthetic, visual and material cultures and the transcendent realms they were designed to evoke, as it is with the kinesthetic, the dynamic and multisensory experience of place and the tangible experiences of the body’s interactions with architecture.