Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 376 items for

  • Just Published x
  • Primary Language: English x
  • Search level: All x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All
The study of taxation is fundamental for understanding the construction of Tibetan polities, the nature of their power – often with a marked religious component – and their relationships with their subjects, as well as the consequences of taxation for social stratification.
This volume takes the analysis of taxation in Tibetan societies (both under the Ganden Phodrang and beyond it) in new directions, using hitherto unexploited Tibetan-language sources. It pursues the dual objective of advancing our understanding of the organisation of taxation from an institutional perspective and of highlighting the ways in which taxpayers themselves experienced and represented these fiscal systems.
Contributors are Saadet Arslan, John Bray, Kalsang Norbu Gurung, Isabelle Henrion-Dourcy, Berthe Jansen, Diana Lange, Nancy E. Levine, Charles Ramble, Isabelle Riaboff, Peter Schwieger, Alice Travers, and Maria M. Turek.
Author:
Lonnin, an English dialect word, means a shared and borrowed, unofficial, track. The Lonnin Project is deliberately genre fluid, designed to resist classification by algorithm – an illustrated verse-novel and account of a creative process in which images, objects and texts are mutually affective. A quest for belonging, and the fickleness of recall in a fragile world, affect key characters in the narrative and the hybrid Project, which, in its entirety, explores creative outputs as a reciprocal refinement between image and text, reversing the habit of thought that prioritizes creative writing over art production. Here text is provisional until the visual illustrations are settled. This creative strategy has been relatively unexplored and so provides a useful guide for practice-based researchers, particularly those interested in Performance Writing.

Unusually, the text initially precedes and provokes 3D artworks which claim to belong to characters in the novel. These objects are slowly hand-built from sustainable, repurposed materials to become the antithesis of ‘merchandise’, occupying a mythical realm between the invented world of the story and material reality, where lonnin claims history resides. The objects are then re-expressed as 2D illustrations, refined to become cyanotypes, which subsequently modify the writing that originally inspired them.