Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Hebrew Bible x
  • Dead Sea Scrolls x
  • Status (Books): Published x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All
Engaging the Hebrew Bible in Early Judaism and Christianity
Ancient Readers and their Scriptures explores the various ways that ancient Jewish and Christian writers engaged with and interpreted the Hebrew Bible in antiquity, focusing on physical mechanics of rewriting and reuse, modes of allusion and quotation, texts and text forms, text collecting, and the development of interpretative traditions.
Contributions examine the use of the Hebrew Bible and its early versions in a variety of ancient corpora, including the Septuagint, Dead Sea Scrolls, New Testament, and Rabbinic works, analysing the vast array of textual permutations that define ancient engagement with Jewish scripture. This volume argues that the processes of reading and cognition, influenced by the physical and intellectual contexts of interpretation, are central aspects of ancient biblical interpretation that are underappreciated in current scholarship.
Studies in Celebration of the Fifth Centennial of the Complutensian Polyglot
In The Text of the Hebrew Bible and its Editions some of the top world scholars and editors of the Hebrew Bible and its versions present essays on the aims, method, and problems of editing the biblical text(s), taking as a reference the Complutensian Polyglot, first modern edition of the Hebrew text and its versions and whose Fifth Centennial was celebrated in 2014. The main parts of the volume discuss models of editions from the Renaissance and its forerunners to the Digital Age, the challenges offered by the different textual traditions, particular editorial problems of the individual books of the Bible, and the role played by quotations. It thus sets a landmark in the future of biblical editions.
In 4QSamuelᵃ and the Text of Samuel, Jason Driesbach offers a thorough analysis of secondary readings in 4QSamuelᵃ (4Q51) along with those in other major witnesses to Samuel (MT, Gᴮ, Gᴸ), leading to a nuanced characterization of the scribal features and textual affiliation of 4QSamuelᵃ, with implications for understanding its place in text-critical studies and literary analyses of the books of Samuel.

4QSamuelᵃ has been regarded by some scholars as an untrustworthy witness to the text of Samuel and by other scholars as a crucial witness, sometimes containing lost readings. Further, some regard this scroll as a non-biblical work based on Samuel. Driesbach’s analysis offers an evaluation of these views based on a sound and thorough consideration of the scroll.
Collected Essays, Volume 3
Thirty-three revised and updated essays on the textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, Qumran and the Septuagint, originally published between 2008 and 2014 are presented in this volume, the third volume of the author’s collected writings. All three areas have developed much in modern research, and the auhor, the past editor-in-chief of the international Dead Sea Scrolls publication project, is a major speaker in all of them. The scrolls are of central importance in the modern textual research and this aspect is well represented in this volume. Among the studies included in this volume are central studies on coincidence, consistency, the Torah, the nature of the MT and SP, the diffusion of manuscripts, and the LXX of Genesis.

The previous two volumes are:
The Greek and Hebrew Bible: Collected Essays on the Septuagint (VTS 72; Leiden: Brill, 1999).
Hebrew Bible, Greek Bible, and Qumran: Collected Essays (TSAJ 121; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2008).