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Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations explores the Arabic translations of the Greek and Syriac Church Fathers, focusing on those produced in the Palestinian monasteries and at Sinai in the 8th–10th centuries and in Antioch during Byzantine rule (969–1084). These Arabic translations preserve patristic texts lost in the original languages. They offer crucial information about the diffusion and influence of patristic heritage among Middle Eastern Christians from the 8th century to the present. A systematic examination of Arabic patristic translations sheds light on the development of Muslim and Jewish theological thought.

Contributors are Aaron Michael Butts, Joe Glynias, Habib Ibrahim, Jonas Karlsson, Sergey Kim, Joshua Mugler, Tamara Pataridze, Alexandre Roberts, Barbara Roggema, Alexander Treiger.
Christian Heresiology and the Intellectual Background to Earliest Christian-Muslim Relations
How did Islam come to be considered a Christian heresy? In this book, Peter Schadler outlines the intellectual background of the Christian Near East that led John, a Christian serving in the court of the caliph in Damascus, to categorize Islam as a heresy. Schadler shows that different uses of the term heresy persisted among Christians, and then demonstrates that John’s assessment of the beliefs and practices of Muslims has been mistakenly dismissed on assumptions he was highly biased. The practices and beliefs John ascribes to Islam have analogues in the Islamic tradition, proving that John may well represent an accurate picture of Islam as he knew it in the seventh and eighth centuries in Syria and Palestine.
Studies on Power in the Medieval World in Honor of William Chester Jordan
William Chester Jordan’s scholarship has demonstrated the complexity of negotiating power at both the center and margins of medieval society, taking us into the inner chambers of medieval power structures where kings, churchmen and courtiers dwell to the margins of society inhabited by disenfranchised peoples such as Jews, women and the poor. Center and Periphery: Studies on Power in the Medieval World in Honor of William Chester Jordan, edited by Katherine L. Jansen, G. Geltner and Anne E. Lester, honors Professor Jordan by taking up these themes and expanding them from France into Spain, Italy, the Lowlands, and the Mediterranean. The volume highlights how Jordan’s work inspired and influenced a generation of medievalists working in North America and Europe today.
Contributors are John W. Baldwin, Adam J. Davis, Jonathan Elukin, Hussein Fancy, Michelle Garceau, G. Geltner, Erica Gilles, Holly J. Grieco, Maya Soifer Irish, Katherine L. Jansen, Emily Kadens, Richard Landes, Jacques Le Goff, Anne E. Lester, Christopher MacEvitt, David Nirenberg, Mark Gregory Pegg , Jarbel Rodriguez, E.M. Rose and Teofilo Ruiz.
The Holy Land, 1517-1713
The collection examines the view of holiness in the “Holy Land” through the writings of pilgrims, travelers, and missionaries. The period extends from 1517, the Ottoman conquest of Syria and Palestine, to the Franco-British treaty of Utrecht in 1713 and the consolidation of European hegemony over the Mediterranean. The writers in the collection include Christians (Orthodox, Protestant, and Catholic), Muslims, and Jews, who originate from countries such as Sweden, England, France, Holland, Russia, the Ottoman Empire, and Syria. This book is the first to juxtapose writers of different backgrounds and languages, to emphasize the holiness of the land in a number of traditions, and to ask whether holiness was inherent in geography or a product of the piety of the writers.

Contributors are: Mohammad Asfour, Hasan Baktir, Richard Coyle, Judy A. Hayden, Nabil I. Matar, Joachim Östlund, Michael Rotenberg-Schwartz, Julia Schleck, Mazin Tadros and Galina Yermolenko.