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Ibn Wāṣil (d. 1298), perhaps better known today as a historian and an emissary to the court of King Manfred in southern Italy, was also an eminent logician. The present work is a critical edition of his main work in the field, a commentary on his teacher Khūnajī’s (d. 1248) handbook al-Jumal. The work helped consolidate the logic of the “later scholars” (such as Khūnajī). It also shows that commentators did much more than merely explain the original work and instead regularly discussed and assessed received views. Ibn Wāṣil’s work was an influential contribution to a particularly dynamic chapter in the history of Arabic logic.
Editors: Michael Lackner and Zhao Lu
This is the first comprehensive book that presents the manifold aspects of divination and prognostication in traditional and modern China, from the early period of oracle bones to present-day fortune-tellers. It introduces what is out there in the field of Chinese divination and prognostication, and how we can further explore it especially through different disciplines. Eminent specialists outline the classifications of divination, recently excavated texts, the relationship between practitioners and clients, the place of the “occult” arts in cosmology, literature and religion, and the bureaucratic system.
Contributors are: Constance Cook, Richard J. Smith, Marc Kalinowski, Stephen R. Bokenkamp, Lü Lingfeng, Liao Hsien-huei, Philip Clart, Fabrizio Pregadio, Esther-Maria Guggenmos, Andrew Schonebaum, and Stéphanie Homola.
Editors / Translators: Finn Gredal Jensen and Jon Stewart
A classicist, philosopher, and poet, Poul Martin Møller was an important figure in the Danish Golden Age. The traumatic event of the death of his wife led him to think more profoundly about the question of the immortality of the soul. In 1837 he published his most important philosophical treatise, “Thoughts on the Possibility of Proofs of Human Immortality,” presented here in English for the first time. It was read and commented upon by the leading figures of the Golden Age, such as Søren Kierkegaard. It proved to be the last important work that Møller wrote before his death in March of 1838 at the age of 43.