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Author: Ian Maclean
In Episodes in the Life of the Early Modern Learned Book, Ian Maclean investigates intellectual life through the prism of the history of publishing, academic institutions, journals, and the German book fairs whose evolution is mapped over the long seventeenth century. After a study of the activities of Italian book merchants up to 1621, the passage into print, both locally and internationally, of English and Italian medicine and ‘new’ science comes under scrutiny. The fate of humanist publishing is next illustrated in the figure of the Dutch merchant Andreas Frisius (1630-1675). The work ends with an analysis of the two monuments of the last phase of legal humanism: the Thesauruses of Otto (1725-44) and Gerard Meerman (1751-80).
Literature and History in an Age of “Nothing Said Too Soon”
In The Politics of Print During the French Wars of Religion, Gregory Haake examines how, in late sixteenth-century France, authors and publishers used the new medium of the printed text to control the terms of public discourse and determine history, or at least their narrative of it.
The creativity of the Renaissance ushered in new instability of discourse and a decline of traditional centres of authority. Gregory Haake shows that poets, authors, printers, and polemicists — including historians, such as Simon Goulart; the great poets of the time, such as Pierre de Ronsard or Agrippa d’Aubigné; or anonymous authors of polemical texts — rushed in to take advantage of discursive uncertainty to discredit their enemies and shape the meaning of history as it unfolded.
In The Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius Loyola: Contexts, Sources, Reception, Terence O’Reilly examines the historical, theological and literary contexts in which the Exercises took shape. The collected essays have as their common theme the early history of the Spiritual Exercises, and the interior life of Ignatius Loyola to which they give expression.
The traditional interpretation of the Exercises was shaped by writings composed in the late sixteenth century, reflecting the preoccupations of the Counter-Reformation world in which they were composed. The Exercises, however, belong, in their origins, to an earlier period, before the Council of Trent, and the full recognition of this fact, and of its implications, has confronted modern scholars with fresh questions about the sources, evolution, and reception of the work.
Author: Ka-Chai Tam
In Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks, Ka-chai Tam argues that the prefectural judge in the judiciary of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) became crucial to upholding justice in Chinese society.

In light of two late Ming casebooks, namely the Mengshui zhai cundu by Yan Junyan and the Zheyu xinyu by Li Qing, Ka-chai Tam demonstrates that the late Ming judges handled their cases with a high level of consistency in judicial reasoning and practice in every type of case, despite their differing regions and literary styles. Equipped with relative institutional independence and growing professionalism, they played an indispensable role in checking and guaranteeing the legal performance of their subordinate magistrates.
In The Lyon Terence Giulia Torello-Hill and Andrew J. Turner take an unprecedented interdisciplinary approach to map out the influence of Late-Antique and Medieval commentary and iconographic traditions over this seminal edition of the plays of Terence, published in Lyon in 1493, and examine its legacy. The work had a profound impact on the way Terence’s plays were read and understood throughout the sixteenth century, but its influence has been poorly recognised in modern scholarship. The authors establish the pivotal role that this book, and its editor Badius, played in the revitalisation of the theoretical understanding of Classical comedy and in the revival of the plays of Terence that foreshadowed the establishment of early modern theatre in Italy and France.
The wide scholarly interests of Scots in the Restoration period are analysed by Murray Simpson through this in-depth study of the library of James Nairn (1629-1678), a Scottish parish minister. The collection demonstrates a remarkable receptivity to new intellectual ideas. At some two thousand titles Nairn’s is the biggest library formed in this period for which we have detailed and accurate records. The collection is analysed by subject. In addition, there is a biographical study and chapters investigating aspects of the Scottish book market and comparing other contemporary Scottish clerical libraries. A short-title catalogue of the collection, giving references to relevant online bibliographies and catalogues, a select provenance index and a subject index complete the work.
Newly Discovered Hebrew Binding Fragments in Context. European Genizah Texts and Studies, Volume 5
This volume includes contributions presented at two conferences, in Mainz and Jerusalem, and presents new discoveries of binding fragments in several European libraries and archives and abroad. It presents newly discovered texts with unknown Jewish writings from the Middle Ages and analyses fragments of well-known texts, such as textual witnesses of Midrashim. One chapter overviews recent discoveries in certain collections, some of them far beyond the geographical horizon of the original project, but certainly all of European origin. Other chapters study palaeographical and codicological issues of manuscript fragments and Ashkenazic inscriptions. A final article refers to the beginnings of scholarly interest in Hebrew binding fragments in Germany and sheds light on the part played by Christian Hebraists in its development.
In: European Genizah
In: European Genizah
In: European Genizah