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Robin J. Greene

Abstract

This study argues that Callimachus’ treatment of his ‘animal-voiced’ contemporaries at the conclusion of the fable in Iamb 2 reflects zoological and physiognomic practices so as to represent the poetic narrator as a taxonomist of men. Elsewhere the classification of men as if they were flora or fauna appears, like fable itself, in distinctly moral and ethical contexts, as, for example, in Theophrastus’ Characters. Callimachus’ formulation of his narrator as a taxonomist who classifies ‘species’ of men based upon their literary ‘voices’ thus plays with modes of invective new to iambos while uniting moral criticism with literary polemic.

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A Dialogic Soliloquy?

On Polyxena’s Conversational Behaviour in E. Hec. 415-422

Gunther Martin

Abstract

In Euripides’ Hecuba, both the scholia and modern interpreters detect a failure of communication in the farewell scene between the protagonist and Polyxena—though the scholiast names Polyxena as the source of the non-dialogue, whereas the modern commentators claim that neither character is engaging. This paper aims, firstly, by a slight redistribution of lines, to restore coherence to the dialogue. Secondly, it argues that it is Hecuba’s rather than Polyxena’s conversational behaviour that impedes the smooth progress of the dialogue. Polyxena is even the one trying to reintegrate her mother into the dialogue. Her linguistic behaviour thus matches her composed and ‘heroic’ overall conduct.

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Emotional Rescue

The Usefulness of Danger in Hellenistic and Roman Epigraphy

Jason Moralee

Abstract

Individuals, city-states, and small-scale communities of worshippers memorialized instances when they were rescued from danger. They did so in a variety of ways, from staging fictional accounts of danger and deliverance to the public praise of local patriots and annual festivals in honor of gods and goddesses for their roles in saving the community. This article examines the significance of epigraphic narratives of endangerment and rescue from the third century BC to the third century AD. It argues that these inscriptions joined individuals into an emotional community of those whose lives had been touched by the gods. These epigraphic narratives point to the social significance of having a status as one rescued by the gods. Talking about one’s own weakness, vulnerability, and misfortune was a key way for individuals and poleis to claim rights and privileges within communities, between them, and across time.

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Mirjam E. Kotwick and Christian Pfeiffer

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In Metaphysics 2.2, 994b21-27 Aristotle comments on how it is possible to think something that is infinitely divisible. Given that Aristotle denies elsewhere that it is possible to think an infinite number of items the passage offers important evidence for Aristotle’s positive account of how one can think something that is infinite. However, Aristotle’s statement in Metaphysics 2.2 has puzzled interpreters since antiquity. This puzzlement has been partly due to a textual problem in the passage. In this paper we first restore the original reading of Metaph. 2.2, 994b25-26 by making use of the evidence in Alexander of Aphrodisias’s commentary and second make sense of the restored passage by interpreting it in light of Aristotle’s thoughts on the infinite in Physics 3 and 8.

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The Murderers of Kotys the Thracian

From Demosthenes to Diogenes Laertios

Pietro Zaccaria

Abstract

In 360/359 BC, Kotys, king of the Odrysian Thracians, was killed by two brothers of Ainos. Confusion, however, soon arose around their identity. The aim of this article is to reconstruct and analyze the various traditions that spread in Antiquity about their identification. Demosthenes was the first to call the murderers Python and Herakleides of Ainos. His version of the facts was later followed by Philodemos, Plutarchos, and Philostratos. Aristoteles, however, called them Πύρρων (or Πάρρων) and Herakleides of Ainos. Diokles of Magnesia, probably following the same tradition as Aristoteles, confused Pyrrhon of Ainos with Pyrrhon of Elis. Similarly, Demetrios of Magnesia confused Herakleides of Ainos with Herakleides Pontikos. Finally, the figures of Kotys, Herakleides, and Python were perhaps reused by the author of the spurious Letters of Chion of Herakleia and recontextualized as symbols of the conflict between philosophy and tyranny.

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Konstantine Panegyres

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Felix J. Meister

Abstract

This article aims to address the problems posed by Sappho’s difficult fr. 114 V. It first revises the assumption that both lines need to display the same metrical profile and concludes that this assumption is unreliable. Then it offers a reconstruction of the fragment that is not restricted by the alleged need for metrical homogeneity.

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Orlando Gibbs

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Why is Latin spectrum a Bad Translation of Epicurus’ ΕΙΔΩΛΟΝ?

Cicero and Cassius on a Point of Philosophical Translation

Sean McConnell