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Abstract

Climate change is expected to be heterogeneous across the world, with high impacts on the Himalayan ecosystems. There is a need to precisely document cambial phenology and wood formation in these regions to better understand climate-growth relationships and how trees face a warming climate. This study describes the dynamics of cambial phenology in pindrow fir (Abies pindrow) along its altitudinal gradient in the Himalaya. The stages of xylem phenology, and the duration and rate of wood formation were assessed from anatomical observations during the growing season from samples collected weekly from three sites at various altitudes (2392–2965 m a.s.l.) over two years. There were significant differences in the duration and rate of cell formation along the altitudinal gradient, which decreased at increasing altitudes. The growing season duration decreased by 5.2 and 3.7 days every 100 m of increase in altitude in 2014 and 2015, respectively, while the rate of cell formation decreased from 0.38 and 0.44 cells /day to 0.29 and 0.34 cells/day in 2014 and 2015, respectively. Cell production decreased from 63.3 and 67.0 cells to 38.3 and 45.2 cells with a decrease of 4.3 and 3.8 cells per 100 m increase in altitude in 2014 and 2015, respectively. The higher precipitation in 2015 increased the growth rate and resulted in a higher xylem production. Our findings give new insights into the dynamics of cambial phenology and help in better understanding of the potential impacts of climate change on tree growth and forest productivity of Himalayan forests.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

We monitored six healthy dominant trees and six girdled Scots pine trees for two successive growing seasons (2014 and 2015) to investigate the seasonal dynamics, cambial activity, and morphology of the new xylem and phloem cells formed under environmental stress when girdling was applied during the dormant period (15 January 2014). Microcore (1.8 mm) samples were collected weekly using a Trephor tool above and below the girdling area, and weather data were measured on site. Drought stress in combination with girdling reduced the total number of differentiation days cell formation. In 2014, no significant differences in tracheid dimensions were observed between the girdled area and the control trees, while in 2015, the control trees showed significantly smaller cell wall thickness and radial dimensions of the latewood tracheids (LW) compared to 2014 and girdled trees had no occurrence of LW. Under stressful heat waves and prolonged periods of no precipitation, the trees tended to reduce the number of tracheids that were formed and exhibited smaller radial dimensions (narrower tree rings) to increase their hydraulic efficiency. Trees responded to limited water availability by forming intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs L) in the zone of the LW to overcome stressful conditions. Although xylem cell differentiation was affected by stressful conditions, no significant variability in phloem cell dimensions was observed. Thus, the phloem tissue was less sensitive to exogenous factors.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

The isolation of wood DNA is a crucial step in the process of genetic identification of wood tissues and the current wood DNA extraction method is a limiting factor. For some valuable wood samples sent for forensic identification, the size of allowable sample is limited. Additionally, the identification process is so lengthy that it often cannot meet the needs of law enforcement. This study describes an optimized protocol that minimizes the sample size and duration of DNA extraction without decreasing the yield of DNA. Experiments on sample mass per extraction, sample lysis time and DNA precipitation time were carried out by a series of gradient tests. The amounts of DNA extracted were evaluated by the copy numbers of target DNA barcodes (rbcL and matK) from droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). It is the first to apply ddPCR technology to quantify and evaluate accurately DNA extracted from wood. The results indicated that 300 mg is an optimal sample mass when keeping the volume of DNA lysis buffer constant, which reduces the sample usage by 40%. Five hours is the optimal sample lysis time. Extending the duration of DNA precipitation does not significantly increase the amplicon yield from wood specimens of Pterocarpus erinaceus. The protocol developed in this study shortens the period of DNA extraction from wood tissues by approximately 58%. The amplicon yields obtained using the optimized method in this study indicate good extraction efficiency, and the wood samples sent for certification were identified as Pterocarpus erinaceus using the barcode combination matK+ndhF-rpl32+ITS2. This method will be suitable for the broad applicability of DNA identification and conservation of global wood resources.

In: IAWA Journal
In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

Mango burl is an important disease affecting many mango plantations in India and causes great loss in yield and decrease of vigour. We carried out a diagnostic survey for burl disease (sometimes also referred to as crown gall) in different varieties of mango (Mangifera indica L., Anacardiaceae) throughout India during 2015 and 2016. More than 500 mango genotypes were screened for disease susceptibility and more than twenty-three mango genotypes in different parts of India were found susceptible to this disease. Burls initiate as small tumorous growths and become more pronounced as warty outgrowths with the increasing age of the individual tree. Samples of burl were collected from all popular varieties from different parts of the country and subjected to histological investigations.

The present study confirms that mango burl disease is caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens using evidence from the “carrot assay” and molecular identification of the presumed causal organism. The latter was isolated and inoculated on carrot disks to induce typical symptoms.

The xylem of the burl tissue was deformed and showed no specific orientation of the wood cells. Dimensional details and morphology of xylem cells vary at different positions within the burl. In a 10 cm diameter burl, the marginal portion showed xylem cells in circular arrangement. Vessel elements and fibres were very short while rays were relatively low and biseriate rays were observed rarely. Orientation of the xylem tissue was lost and all three plains (i.e. transverse, tangential and radial view) were observed in the same section. Cells from the middle portion of the burl were isodiametric, oval to circular, thick-walled and lignified, in morphology not dissimilar from callus tissue. Tyloses were common in all the cell types viz. fibres, ray cells, tracheids, axial parenchyma cells, and vessel elements.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

The characteristics of cross-field pitting among compression wood, lateral wood, and opposite wood, in the stem woods of Ginkgo biloba and Pinus densiflora were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. In Ginkgo biloba, compression wood exhibited piceoid pits, while lateral and opposite wood exhibited cupressoid pits. The compression wood of Pinus densiflora exhibited cupressoid pits and piceoid pits, while lateral wood and opposite wood exhibited pinoid and window-like pits in the cross-field. In both species, compression wood yielded the smallest pit number among each part, while opposite wood yielded the greatest pit number per cross-field. Cross-field pitting diameters of compression wood and opposite wood were significantly smaller than lateral wood in Ginkgo biloba, while the cross-field pitting of compression wood was the smallest in Pinus densiflora. Radial tracheid diameter of compression wood was slightly smaller than lateral and opposite wood in Ginkgo biloba and significantly smaller than lateral and opposite wood in Pinus densiflora. In conclusion, the cross-field pitting type, pit number, and cross-field pitting diameter could be used to identify reaction wood in the stem wood of Ginkgo biloba and Pinus densiflora.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

Our study investigated the effect of stem temperature increase on xylem formation in Robinia pseudoacacia tree-trunks, caused by direct exposure to solar radiation. It is important to determine factors which may improve the concentricity of deposited wood tissue and intensify xylogenesis because a strong irregularity of wood tissue deposited in the radial direction in mature trees of R. pseudoacacia reduces the commercial value of the wood. Samples of vascular cambium along with adjacent tissues were collected from the southern (illuminated) and northern (shaded) side of tree-trunks growing in the inner and peripheral (thus exposed to direct sunlight) zones of the research plot. Sampling was performed several times during the growing season. The collected material was examined by epifluorescence microscopy and the thickness of deposited tissue comprising cambial xylem derivatives was measured. Deposition of a markedly greater amount of xylem on the southern side of tree-trunks in the peripheral zone of the plot was observed before full leaf development. Instrumental climatic data confirmed that in the early stage of the growing season, temperature on the southern side of the peripheral zone tree-trunk was higher than on the northern side. No clear response in terms of directional deposition of xylem was noticed in the inner zone trees and in peripheral zone trees after full leaf development. This study highlights the importance of temperature increase, caused by solar radiation, for R. pseudoacacia xylogenesis, which may be considered as a factor that affects the course of the radial growth before full leaf development.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

Paper quality depends on fiber diameter and wall thickness, and their derivatives. Fiber deformation occurs due to pressure from the vessel during development. The diameter and wall thickness of the fibers were measured following the direction of pressure exerted by the vessel on the face of the fiber cells. Fiber cell diameter measured perpendicular to and parallel with vessel enlargement was referred to as radial and tangential diameter, respectively, and likewise for fiber wall thickness. Differences in radial and tangential diameter and wall thickness of fiber cells in relation to their distance from vessels were analyzed. The radial diameter of fibers adjacent to large vessels decreased from the first to the fifth fiber, and from the first to the second fiber adjacent to small vessels. Conversely, tangential fiber diameter increased from the first to the fifth fiber for fibers adjacent to large vessels, and from the first to the second fiber adjacent to small vessels. The fibers adjacent to the vessel seem to have thicker walls in both the tangential than radial directions up to 2 and 5 fibers for small and large vessels, respectively. The first two fibers adjacent to small diameter vessels may produce higher strength paper than those up to five fibers from large diameter vessels, because the Runkel ratio, Coefficient of rigidity and Muhlsteph ratio values of fibers adjacent to small vessels are lower than fibers adjacent to large vessels. The opposite occurs for flexibility coefficient values.

In: IAWA Journal
In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

We aimed to explore the effects of different concentrations, in particular, high concentrations, of exogenously applied ethephon and methyl jasmonate on gum duct formation in three broad-leaved tree species, Cerasus × yedoensis, Prunus mume and Liquidambar styraciflua. Intact shoots were treated with ethephon and methyl jasmonate in lanolin paste at concentrations of 0.1%, 1%, 2%, 5%, and 10% (w/w). The ethephon treatments induced gum duct formation in the xylem adjacent to the cambium in all three species, whereas the methyl jasmonate treatments did not. The highest induction of gum duct formation was observed after 1–2% ethephon treatments in C. × yedoensis and P. mume, and after 5–10% ethephon treatments in L. styraciflua. Meanwhile, the treatments with higher ethephon concentrations resulted in a lower induction of gum duct formation in C. × yedoensis and P. mume. In addition, we examined gum duct formation at sites distant from the treatment sites in C. × yedoensis and P. mume shoots treated with 10% ethephon. Gum duct formation was found to be the highest at sites 2 cm away from the treatment site (in the acropetal direction). We show that at least in C. × yedoensis and P. mume, trees have an optimal concentration of ethephon to induce gum duct formation, and that concentrations higher than the optimum suppress the induction.

In: IAWA Journal