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Taking Supranational Citizenship Seriously
This collective volume examines how EU citizenship reconstructs in unexpected ways what citizenship as a status means and stands for. EU citizenship can neither be accurately described as a citizenship status similar to national citizenship, nor as an immigration one. The book examines the tension at the heart of attempts to grasp the nature of EU citizenship as supranational status in relation to family reunification, social rights and expulsion. It shows that while events such as Brexit stress the importance of EU citizenship, the construction of supranational citizenship along the axis of non-discrimination and equality remains a work in progress that requires the efforts of all actors involved - institutions, implementing authorities, courts and citizens.
Contemporary Challenges and Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Challenging questions arise in the effort to adequately protect the cultural rights of individuals and communities worldwide, not the least of which are questions concerning the very understanding of ‘culture’. In Cultural Rights in International Law and Discourse: Contemporary Challenges and Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Pok Yin S. Chow offers an account of the present-day challenges to the articulation and implementation of cultural rights in international law. Through examining how ‘culture’ is conceptualised in different stages of contemporary anthropology, the book explores how these understandings of ‘culture’ enable us to more accurately put issues of cultural rights into perspective. The book attempts to provide analytical exits to existing conundrums and dilemmas concerning the protections of culture, cultural heritage and cultural identity.
In: Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain
In: Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain
In: Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain
In: Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain
Rethinking the Role of Power and Authority
The public debate on Shariʿa councils in Britain has been heavily influenced by the assumption that the councils exist as religious authorities and that those who use them exercise their right to religious freedom. In Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain Tanya Walker draws on extensive fieldwork from over 100 cases to argue for a radically different understanding of the setting and dynamics of the Shariʿa councils. The analysis highlights the pragmatic manoeuvrings of Muslim women, in pursuit of defined objectives, within limited space – holding in tension both the constraints of particular frameworks of power, and the realities of women’s agency. Despite this needed nuance in a polarised debate however, important questions about the rights of Muslim women remain.
In: Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain
In: Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain
In: Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain