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Academic Activism in the Neoliberal Era
Author: Philippe Peycam
In: Logos

The Macmillan Company New York, led by the Bretts, was a major player in American life. But it had a secret: the company was majority owned by the London parent. As the US came to eclipse the UK, the arrangement led to growing tensions. Finally, in 1951, London was persuaded to sell its stake. But the UK firm found itself unable to use the family name for a new American venture, sparking a legal fight that lasted until 2002. This account of an important event in publishing history adds new detail from archival sources, supporting a fresh reading and correcting earlier errors. It also brings into view a significant amount of material that is published for the first time. The article argues that, although there were hard business reasons for the sale, cultural and personal factors were also consequential and these two types of agency, rational and emotional, work in interrelated ways.

In: Logos

DesignAgility is an adaptation of the design thinking method and was developed to meet the specific needs of the publishing industry and the media sector in general. The authors of the eponymous book embedded DesignAgility into an agile framework that allows its users to effectively develop and implement media innovations with a small team. This sample chapter of the book focuses on Ideation and describes the qualified brainstorming and idea-generating in the innovation process. The needs of the users aka the ‘personas’ are reflected in so-called ‘user stories’. Through refinement the ideas are developed into possible product or service features. The chapter describes detailed steps from preparation to procedure and includes a checklist of how to easily follow the instructions for ideation. The visualization of the DesignAgility process shows where this step has to be taken within the whole innovation process.

In: Logos

In this article the authors analyse narratives of the ‘agents’ associated with book publishing in Latvia, instrumentalizing the Bourdieusian theoretical framework of habitus–capital–field in order to understand the particulars of power relationships in the national book publishing field. Based on the results of the narrative analysis, authors conclude that power relationships in book publishing in Latvia have historically shifted during periods when major social transformations have taken place in other fields of the social world (e.g. political, economic) and echoed in the publishing field in the form of altered conditions. Depending on each agent’s position in the field, these changes have meant that values and meanings linked with the practice of publishing have either had to be adjusted or been significantly disruptive.

In: Logos
Author: Miriam Johnson

The publishing industry has a variety of gatekeepers that play a role in deciding which works become books. This article acknowledges the main gatekeepers as the agent and publishers, but also draws attention to the author, who is the first gatekeeper, and the reader, who is the last. The connections between gatekeepers highlight the role of power in these positions. Using Foucault’s theories of archaeology and genealogy, this article argues that positions within the industry provide space for the gatekeepers to say what works deserve to be published. In doing so it highlights the dynamic flow of power, which rises from the bottom and provides a hierarchical structure within the industry.

In: Logos
The evolving societal, political and economic landscape has led to increased demands on higher education institutions to make their contribution and benefits to society more visible, and in many cases with fewer public resources. This book contributes to the understanding of the responsibilities of Higher Education and the challenges posed to the production and circulation of knowledge. It raises questions about the role of higher education in society, its responsibility towards students and staff, and regarding its intended impact. The book brings together a range of topical papers, and a diversity of perspectives: scientific investigations of reputed scholars, critical evidence-based papers of third space professionals, and policymakers’ perspectives on the daily practice and management of higher education institutions and systems. The variety of both content and contributors elevates the richness of the book and its relevance for a large audience.

Contributors are: Victor M. H. Borden, Lex Borghans, Bruno Broucker, Hamish Coates, Gwilym Croucher, Lisa Davidson, Mark Engberg, Philipp Friedrich, Martina Gaisch, Solomon Gebreyohans Gebru, Ton Kallenberg, Kathi A. Ketcheson, Lu Liu, Alfredo Marra, Clare Milsom, Kenneth Moore, Roberto Moscati, Marjolein Muskens, Daniela Nömeyer, Attila Pausits, Svetlana Shenderova, Wafa Singh, Chuanyi Wang, Denyse Webbstock, Gregory Wolniak, and Jiale Yang.
Author: Ton Kallenberg

Abstract

This exploratory study is part of a larger inquiry that investigates the roles and practices of academic leaders in Higher Education. This chapter explores the relationship between trust, strategic behavior of academic (middle) leaders, and their ambition to achieve personal, organizational or societal status within the organizational strategy. A key aspect in the functioning of academic (middle) leaders is the way they fulfill the role of broker: they ‘knit together’ organizational activities and mediate, negotiate and interpret connections between top and ground levels throughout the organization. In this way, they fulfill four strategic roles in a more or less intensive manner: championing, synthesizing, facilitating, implementing. In this chapter it is argued that relational and organizational based trust influences the strategic roles of academic (middle) leaders and their ambitions of strategic levels. Because academic leaders are in a pivotal position within a university, their behavior is an important factor in the difference between successful and unsuccessful strategies of universities.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems

Abstract

In their attempt to redefine the relationship between state and higher education institutions by the end of the century, national administrations in Europe underwent changes in their organizational format and governance approach toward the sector. This chapter presents parts of a doctoral thesis that examined closely the governance changes taking place in Austrian and Norwegian HE in the early 2000s. Central to the thesis were organizational transformations at the ministerial level and the creation of governmental agencies in the area of quality assurance and internationalization, using organizational autonomy and capacity as analytical dimensions. Based on statistical data, legal frameworks, policy documents, and expert interviews, the thesis shed light on how governments in higher education transformed against the backdrop of substantive governance reforms. The Austrian approach included capacity reductions at the ministerial level, and a cautious approach toward the empowerment of governmental agencies. The Norwegian approach involved stable capacity developments at the ministerial level, while similarly expanding autonomy and capacity of governmental agencies.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems

Abstract

This chapter presents an emerging concept within the context of higher education study abroad, intercultural wonderment. This concept is understood as students’ underlying curiosity to seek out novel experiences and their willingness and capacity to deal with discomfort while studying abroad. We review findings related to intercultural wonderment from earlier research efforts with which we have been involved. In particular, we discuss some of the applications and limitations of this earlier work. We present our current thinking about inquiry on intercultural wonderment as it relates to informing both educational practice and research related to study abroad. The chapter concludes by explaining research with which we are presently involved and implications for optimizing teaching, learning, assessment, and research in study abroad contexts.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems